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Yo-Ichiro Hakomori, Ph.D., AIA

Associate Professor of Practice

BS, Whitman College; M.Arch, UCLA; PhD, Engineering in Architecture, University of Tokyo


Yo-ichiro Hakomori is a Design Principal at DesignARC - Los Angeles, and StudioHAU. DesignARC - Los Angeles is a multi-disciplinary design studio with a wide range of projects. Their work includes single and multi-family residential, small commercial, educational, and public - civic projects with work throughout the United States and parts of Asia. Hakomori received his Master of Architecture from the Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a Doctor of Engineering in Architecture from the University of Tokyo. Prior to joining DesignARC, he was founding partner at wHY Architecture and Design. Along with partner Kulapat Yantrasast, wHY Architecture completed the Grand Rapids Art Museum, the first LEED gold certified museum in the world in 2007. With their knowledge and passion for “invisible green” and art, wHY Architecture received numerous commissions for other art related projects throughout the country including the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky; gallery/exhibit design at the Harvard Art Museums in Cambridge, Massachusetts and at the Art Institute of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois; L&M Arts in Venice, California; Royal T Gallery and Café in Culver City, California; and the Perry Rubenstein Gallery in West Hollywood, California. Hakomori was also principal architect for the Tyler Museum of Art in Tyler, Texas; the Pomona College Studio Art Hall in Claremont, California; the Interpretive Green Bridge (Art Bridge) at the Great Wall of Los Angeles, in North Hollywood, California; and a number of single family residences in Los Angeles and Thailand. Hakomori has also taught at the University of Tokyo, Meiji University, Cal Poly Pomona College of Environmental Design, and at the School of Architecture and Allied Arts at the University of Oregon. He teaches both undergraduate and graduate studios and has been interested in the relationship between landscape, urbanism, art, and architecture, conducting studio projects exploring this topic. He also leads the USC Global Initiative study abroad program to Japan and China.


 
 
Currently Teaching
  • 316
    Place and Culture
    Place and Culture
    The goal of this seminar is to understand the cultural context of Spain, by examining its architecture, history, political and economic developments. Beginning in Madrid and travelling north, we will visit cities and landscapes and examine the variety of influences that determine their form. In Barcelona we will analyze the city’s major urban and architectural sites, topography, and systems of urban organization. We will examine Barcelona’s architectural practices that challenge and engage European traditional and modernist orthodoxies and its culture committed to design. In Southern Spain, we will examine cities shaped by a coexistence of different influences (Jewish, Christian, Muslim) and others dominated by one. While certain aspects of the built environment are intentional, others are not. How did a theory of urban and architectural design emerge in Spain, and where did it come from? What constitutes a “cultural geography” of place?
     
  • 402aL
    Architectural Design IV
    Architectural Design IV
    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 302bL A collection can be a lot of things, in fashion and design, it suggests a family resemblance between a series of objects, either acquired or designed over an extended period of time. A collection has a temporal relationship with space and time, it can reflect a variety of styles, and set predictions for upcoming social and cultural trends. A collection offers unique organizational, generative potentialities, as well as, spatial adaptive qualities. The studio seeks to investigate and re-interpret furniture collections as generative aggregate systems of growth that can define space. How can an “Urban furniture collection” generate a spatial framework that can multiply/grow/morph/change in reaction to future social and cultural occupations?
     
  • 406
    Global Studies Topics in Architecture, Urbanism, History & Art
    Global Studies Topics in Architecture, Urbanism, History & Art
    In preparation for the spring semester in Italy, this two-unit course introduces students to Italian history, to the history of Italian architecture, and to Italian culture. It includes a section on the history of Northern Europe. It prepares students for living in Italy in the Spring 2013 semester, for learning to interrogate and analyze diverse urban cultures, and for adapting to a different culture and language.
     
  • 424L
    Field Studies in Architecture
    Field Studies in Architecture
    Assignments rely principally on field trips and field research, while additional readings, class discussions and research will be utilized to develop a body of information and method of critique. Field research will focus on the first-hand observation, analysis, and documentation of existing buildings and their contexts so that lessons-learned can inform the design methodology applied in studio. Students will be challenged to articulate their analyses with respect to the specific urban, temporal, and cultural contexts. There will be ten assignments for each course: nine specific assignments and one assignment that you may choose the subject of yourself.
     
  • 425L
    Field Studies in Urbanism
    Field Studies in Urbanism
    The focus of ARCH 425 is on urban spaces, including parks, plazas, and urban(re)development projects. The field study of these urban spaces also provides an opportunity to understand the complex role of the architect-designer in the design of urban spaces. As a critical component of the urban environment, landscape architecture will be an important aspect of this class. These investigations will employ analytical methods, representational techniques, and speculative inquiry into the fundamental spatial and infra-structural elements of the city. Your research will be documented and communicated through mapping, plans/sections/elevations, diagrams, photo documentation and text.
     
 
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