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Olivier Touraine

Associate Professor of Practice

Dipl Arch, Ecole d'Architecture de Paris-la-Villette


Olivier Touraine graduated from the School of Architecture of Paris La Villette in 1987. Awarded the "Album de la Jeune Architecture" in 1994 (best architectural firm under 40). He received the "Villa Medicis Hors les Murs" Grant in 2000 and the Chevalier des Arts et Lettres in 2005. He worked from 1987 to 1991 with Renzo Piano on the Kansai Airport Project in Osaka, Japan; with OMA/Rem Koolhaas, in Lille on the Congrexpo building in 1991; from 1992 to 1998 with Jean Nouvel in Paris on various projects in France, Eastern Europe and Asia; and from 1998 to 1999 with OMA/Rem Koolhaas, in Los Angeles on the Universal Studio HQ project. These three architects have all received the Pritzker Prize, the highest award in architecture. Olivier is currently a principal at Studio Touraine which was created in January 2012 following 14 years at Touraine Richmond Architects in Venice, CA,. Olivier teaches design studios at the University of Southern California. He has previously held teaching positions at UCLA, Columbia University, Pratt Institute, and SCI- Arc.


 
 
Currently Teaching
  • 402aL
    Architectural Design IV
    Architectural Design IV
    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 302bL A collection can be a lot of things, in fashion and design, it suggests a family resemblance between a series of objects, either acquired or designed over an extended period of time. A collection has a temporal relationship with space and time, it can reflect a variety of styles, and set predictions for upcoming social and cultural trends. A collection offers unique organizational, generative potentialities, as well as, spatial adaptive qualities. The studio seeks to investigate and re-interpret furniture collections as generative aggregate systems of growth that can define space. How can an “Urban furniture collection” generate a spatial framework that can multiply/grow/morph/change in reaction to future social and cultural occupations?
     
  • 402bL
    Architectural Design IV
    Architectural Design IV
    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 402aL Selected areas of specialization; three projects chosen with advisement from a variety of studio offerings that concentrate on different areas of vital concern.
     
  • 406
    Global Studies Topics in Architecture, Urbanism, History & Art
    Global Studies Topics in Architecture, Urbanism, History & Art
    In preparation for the spring semester in Italy, this two-unit course introduces students to Italian history, to the history of Italian architecture, and to Italian culture. It includes a section on the history of Northern Europe. It prepares students for living in Italy in the Spring 2013 semester, for learning to interrogate and analyze diverse urban cultures, and for adapting to a different culture and language.
     
  • 426L
    Field Studies in Tectonics
    Field Studies in Tectonics
    Buildings embody a series of performative criteria that form the fundamental motives for an architectural task. These functions are critical considerations in building design and are accomplished within the context of technological and economic possibilities. The focus of the course will be on technology in architecture, with an emphasis on structure, materiality, construction, material and assembly, and sustainability. Using annotated photo documentation, notations, and diagrams these criteria will be analyzed to explore how technology affects the form, the assembly of the architectural response, and, ultimately, how technology is integrated into the methodology of accomplishing the greater architectural goals of the building.
     
  • 500aL
    Comprehensive Architectural Design
    Comprehensive Architectural Design
    Prerequisite(s): 402abL Corequisite(s): ARCH 501 Note: Substitution for previously required ARCH 402cL Selected areas of specialization; projects chosen from a variety of studio offerings, all with an emphasis on the comprehensive design of buildings.
     
  • 580
    Field Studies
    Field Studies

    One of the most important aspects of field research is the opportunity to gain insight into the relationships between design language, building proposition and construction process of specific periods/architects/buildings/landscapes. It is an occasion to discover not only the tenets upon which an designer bases his work, but also how these tenets resolve complex relationships between a project, its site and the cultural/theoretical context in which it was constructed. Through thoughtful case study analysis students will explore how these external forces influence/direct the form and shape of the designed response.


    This Field Studies course will concentrate on projects and practices [from the analysis of buildings to the focused engagement with the methods of practice], landscapes and ecologies [both natural and manmade], and urban spaces [including parks, plazas, and urban (re)development projects]. The field study of these spaces and methods also provides an opportunity to understand the complex relationship of the designer with place. These place-based investigations will engage field studies to employ analytical methods, representational techniques, and speculative inquiry into the fundamental spatial and infra-structural elements of place. This investigation allows one to develop awareness as well as appreciate the complex relationship between a place, its inhabitants and the spaces that facilitate a multitude of events and activities.

     
  • 705L
    Advanced Graduate Architecture Design- Topics
    Advanced Graduate Architecture Design- Topics
    Advanced topical investigations emphasizing diverse areas of specialization. Projects will be faculty-led research investigations that concentrate on diverse areas of vital concern.
     
 
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