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John Dutton

Adjunct Associate Professor

B.A., Brown University M.Arch, Princeton University


John Dutton is an architect and urban designer and principal of Los Angeles based Dutton Architects. He specializes in both the design of individual buildings (houses, housing, commercial buildings, civic buildings etc.) as well as the urban framework within which they sit (master planning, campus planning, etc.) He has written numerous articles, authored the book New American Urbanism: (Re)forming the Suburban Metropolis, and lectured worldwide. At the USC School of Architecture John has led graduate and undergraduate design studios, taught in the overseas programs (Asia Architecture and Landscape Urbanism as well as Barcelona), and teaches a required graduate course on Architecture of the Modern City.


Related Links: Grids Blogduttonarchitects.com

 
 
Currently Teaching
  • 425L
    Field Studies in Urbanism
    Field Studies in Urbanism
    The focus of ARCH 425 is on urban spaces, including parks, plazas, and urban(re)development projects. The field study of these urban spaces also provides an opportunity to understand the complex role of the architect-designer in the design of urban spaces. As a critical component of the urban environment, landscape architecture will be an important aspect of this class. These investigations will employ analytical methods, representational techniques, and speculative inquiry into the fundamental spatial and infra-structural elements of the city. Your research will be documented and communicated through mapping, plans/sections/elevations, diagrams, photo documentation and text.
     
  • 426L
    Field Studies in Tectonics
    Field Studies in Tectonics
    Buildings embody a series of performative criteria that form the fundamental motives for an architectural task. These functions are critical considerations in building design and are accomplished within the context of technological and economic possibilities. The focus of the course will be on technology in architecture, with an emphasis on structure, materiality, construction, material and assembly, and sustainability. Using annotated photo documentation, notations, and diagrams these criteria will be analyzed to explore how technology affects the form, the assembly of the architectural response, and, ultimately, how technology is integrated into the methodology of accomplishing the greater architectural goals of the building.
     
 
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