03/15/21 Faculty/Student Exhibition Spotlight: Farnoosh Rafaie

 

Our virtual faculty/student exhibition series continues with “Tangibility of the Gaze, Notes on Ayeneh Kari,” a new show from lecturer Farnoosh Rafaie. Formed within the 17th Safavid era in Persia and re-formed through the sublime works of Monir Farmanfarmaian, Ayeneh Kari inscribes pure, hyper tessellated geometry through the interplay of light and reflection. Absurdly disparate in their formation, these mirror mosaics exhibit the dynamic overcoating of figure within figure through identifiable consciousness. This exhibition chooses to display just a few sourced contemplations on figures built from two-dimensional cosmic geometry to “three-dimensional” digital sculpture, noting how these dazzling figures can be absorbed through the familial presence of one’s own image. 


The intent of the exhibition program is not only to highlight the professional work or academic research of our faculty but also to offer insights into connections between their pedagogy and practice. Below, Rafaie shares additional details about her exhibition. 


What inspired this exhibition?

 

A fascination with the undiscovered works of mirror mosaics, Ayeneh Kari is not often discussed against the backdrop of more Western-based investigations on platonic studies. These uniquely glittering surfaces offer up a manner of engagement based on one's own image—what we see and how we see shaping the product of our own identity. These personalized modes of specular reflection are never tied to one individual and as such consistently take on the dynamic qualities of each observer.


More generally, what inspires your work?


I am particularly drawn to work that questions ordinary conventions and attempts to reshape its character. At first read, this might seem like a blanket statement, though the way in which we explore image and space is constantly bounded by initial images and experiences. How we can find ways of subverting these established notions has always held a gratifying set of conclusions in my own personal investigations. 

 

What do you hope viewers take away from this exhibition?


A sense of delight and amusement with a touch of curiosity. These works choose to poke and prod at the conventions of cosmic geometry native to Iran. These provocations may perhaps illicit a bit of response from these strange but bewitching forms.


To view the gallery, visit https://exhibitions.uscarch.com/tangibility-of-the-gaze-notes-on-ayeneh-kari/.


 
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