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694

Research Publication Methods for Building Science

 

Technical documentation, graphic representation, and verbal presentation for writing and presenting journal articles and conference presentations in building science.

 
 
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    Structure and Design: https://titles.cognella.com/structure-and-design.html/


    Detailed information is posted at http://www.usc.edu/structures/

     
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    Research Publication Methods for Building Science
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    Technical documentation, graphic representation, and verbal presentation for writing and presenting journal articles and conference presentations in building science.