CLOSE
ALL NUMBERS
100-199
200-299
300-399
400-499
500-599
600+
ALL DISCIPLINES
ARCHITECTURE
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
GEODESIGN
BUILDING SCIENCE
HERITAGE CONSERVATION
URBANISM
ALL SEMESTERS
FALL
SPRING
SUMMER


REQUEST D-CLEARANCE
102al
Architectural Design I
Architectural Design I
Examine the critical role of materials and methods for the design and construction of buildings. The primary focus is on materials and systems, their properties and connections, and their intrinsic relationship to structural systems and environmental performance. Students will develop a fundamental understanding of: the relationship of materiality to construction systems and techniques, how building materials are manufactured, and how a material’s modular form, dimensions and intrinsic qualities influence the design process. Students will learn about various building systems, and how these systems assist in the expression of a design concept, through an examination of precedent projects whose design concepts were generated by material logics and systems. Students will work hands-on with building materials (concrete, wood, metal, etc.) to get an understanding of each material’s properties.
 
102bl
Architectural Design I
Architectural Design I
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 102aL Introduction to principles and processes; sequence of exercises emphasizing development of basic skills, ideas, and techniques used in the design of simplified architectural projects. Prerequisite: ARCH 102aL.
 
105l
Fundamentals of Design Communication
Fundamentals of Design Communication
This course is an introduction to the practice of visual representation and conceptual communication in the field of spatial design and architecture. Drawing has long been the notation system for re- presenting 3D ideas projected onto a 2D surface and will be explored and interrogated through a series of in-class exercises, field-trips, lectures and film screenings. Los Angeles will play the role of the subject matter, examined through various scales of representation, providing relevant material for analysis. Representational techniques, systems and types will be introduced in four parts throughout the semester: 1. Line, Shape, Composition, 2. Orthographic Projection, 3. Paraline / Oblique Projection, and 4. Experiential. Each quadrant will be capped with a cumulative assignment and a final project at the end of the semester will require the students to demonstrate a comprehensive graphic analysis and refined drawing output.
 
106x
Workshop in Architecture
Workshop in Architecture
This course is an introduction to the processes involved in the creation and understanding of architecture. The workshop, designed for architecture minors and non-architecture majors, is a project-based laboratory involving drawing and model making, with no previous design or drawing experience needed. The course is structured around projects executed in class throughout the semester, a series of readings and discussions, visits to sites of architectural interest and a term paper. Over the course of this class, you will develop: - A preliminary architectural vocabulary - Basic 2D and 3D technical and freehand drawing skills - Basic model making skills - An understanding of the methods through which architecture communicates ideas and intentions - An understanding of the role which architectural history plays in shaping the work of contemporary architects - An understanding of how the architect conceives, creates and executes a project Most of the learning in this course happens in class, through workshop projects and through exchange of ideas with your instructor and classmates. Therefore, participation and engagement in class are required. There is a natural progression to the classes; projects and readings build upon each other. If you are absent, it is your responsibility to meet with the instructor for instructions and materials to complete the missed assignment before the next class.
 
114
Architecture Culture and Community
Architecture Culture and Community
This introductory course investigates the role of architecture as a cultural product linked to a variety of external influences that shape the built and natural environment. Students will develop an awareness of design as a collaborative process and address issues of environmental sustainability, social responsibility, human behavior, diversity, and community.
 
202aL
Architectural Design II
Architectural Design II
Students will build on the techniques and methodologies gained in the first-year program, while adding to them a comprehensive idea about site as a cultural and physical generator of architectural form. Students will be introduced to methods of site analysis and research, new generative drawing techniques, as well as the architectural and disciplinary conventions associated with site work. Prerequisite: ARCH 102bL.
 
202bL
Architectural Design II
Architectural Design II
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 202aL As a second year design student, you began by seeing Los Angeles and notions of site anew. In the second semester of your second year you will continue to embark on re-reading conventional notions of architecture - this time by re-imagining materiality. Rather than working in the linear sequence of designing first, selecting material second, we will ask: how can the process of making and experimentation in the studio setting directly inform new and unexpected notions of materiality? By studying materiality in the nascent stages of design, the process of making can begin to inform new perceptions of space, time, and effect. This semester we will challenge Robin Evan’s repeated claim that “architects make drawings, not buildings.” We will work from the position that architects engage directly with the matter of construction. The process of building physical models will not be merely a representation of an a priori idea but instead will be seen as a search for material understanding. Material behavior and interaction cannot be predicted or determined through static representation alone. Your process for design will be akin to the scientific method, in which empirical models and a set of hypotheses, tests, and conclusions will be the basis for analysis and guide work flow. Given the established divide between traditional building materials, i.e brick, steel, or glass, and unconventional materials, typically thought of as those not traditionally used in building trades, we will interrogate this dichotomy in order to rethink both sides of the equation. We will explore how to use conventional materials in unconventional ways and unconventional materials in newfound architectural ways. With this exploration, the use of both analog and digital tools and a deliberate understanding of the appropriateness of when to employ each, will be crucial. Lastly, we will carefully consider the consequences, aesthetically and culturally, that come from our experiments and newfound notions of materiality. In Project One, As a Matter of Fact & Fiction, we will re-imagine the material framework of existing (factual) houses, chosen for their neutral relationship to materiality. By investigating these buildings through new (fictional) model-building techniques - the stereotomic, the tectonic, and the monocoque - the process of experimentation to understand material behavior at the scale of the model will begin. In Project Two, Material Musings, these novel notions will be scaled to the size of a small chamber, exposing the often deceptive discontinuities in shifts that come from moving between the scale of the architectural model and full-scale fabrication. In Project Three, Material Mash-Up, materiality will drive the design of a small library building, paired with a wild- card program to encourage cross-materiality.
 
203
Visualizing and Experiencing the Built Environment
Visualizing and Experiencing the Built Environment
This course is intended to introduce the processes of visualization in relation to the alert experience of built environments and their inhabitation. Visualizing the built environment is recognition of places and activities, their organization, and the processes of change they embody. Visualization is thus a process of directly seeing and engaging places in order to discern conditions and finding the means to reflect on the findings. Reflection requires not only such direct engagement, but also systematic means for considering experience across multiple times and seasons as well as influenced by culture and dynamic city life. Students are expected to develop an urban sensibility and the ability to use non-verbal as well as verbal methods of inquiry for appreciating the spatial structure and life of built environments.
 
205aL
Building Science I
Building Science I
Prerequisite(s): CE 107 This course will help the student comprehend the nature of beauty in our surroundings, and to create an appreciation and understanding of how and why these systems of beauty are established. The primary objective is to expose the student to current issues related to design in architecture, and to teach the intrinsic nature of architecture developed through principles based on the construction process. These topics are indications of the various value systems that come into play in the contemporary field of architecture. Understanding this and becoming aware that design is a synthetic process that is a balance of many concerns is a major objective of the course. The course will explore basic principals of 2 and 3 dimensional compositions though a series of design exercises, lectures, and critiques; focusing on the intrinsic properties of materials applied in structural and conceptual expression. Emphasis is placed on design as a creative, conceptually driven, iterative process. Attention is given to theories of context, unity, order, proportion, shape, balance, form, and space as they apply to abstract composition and structural design. Expression of ideas and values present in physical form are explored through observation, analysis, transformation, and synthesis. Students develop and document projects using a variety of means, including model making, REVIT or OTHER software programs, sketching, mechanical drawing, and photography. Project craft and execution are emphasized. The process and communication of building design: physical building shell, systems for structure, enclosure, and space ordering. Prerequisite: CE 107.
 
205bL
Building Science I
Building Science I
Prerequisite(s): CE 107 The process and communication of building design: physical building shell, systems for structure, enclosure, and space ordering. Prerequisite: CE 107.
 
207
Computer Applications in Architecture
Computer Applications in Architecture
Computer Aided Design (CAD) has become an essential tool for architecture students (and other students interested in design) while in school and for professional work. Initially, CAD was seen as computer-aided drafting, a translation of manual methods of producing drawings into a digital method of doing something similar. The term CAD has grown beyond that. Explore digital models with a special emphasis on thinking about the relationships between 2d and 3d, virtual and real, and especially fabrication.
 
211
Materials and Methods of Building Construction
Materials and Methods of Building Construction

Basic considerations and design implications of the problem of determination of the materials and the construction details and processes for buildings.


Examine the critical role of materials and methods for the design and construction of buildings. The primary focus is on materials and systems, their properties and connections, and their intrinsic relationship to structural systems and environmental performance.


Students will develop a fundamental understanding of: the relationship of materiality to construction systems and techniques, how building materials are manufactured, and how a material’s modular form, dimensions and intrinsic qualities influence the design process.


Students will learn about various building systems, and how these systems assist in the expression of a design concept, through an examination of precedent projects whose design concepts were generated by material logics and systems. Students will work hands-on with building materials (concrete, wood, metal, etc.) to get an understanding of each material’s properties.

 
213ag
Building Structures and Seismic Design
Building Structures and Seismic Design
Prerequisite(s): PHYS 125 and MATH 108 Structure defines form and space and supports gravity, lateral, and thermal loads. The course introduces the four S’s required for architectural structures: Synergy, Strength, Stiffness, and Stability. Synergy, a system greater the sum of its parts, reinforces architectural objectives; strength resists breaking; stiffness resists deformation; and stability resists collapse. Structures must also resist bending, shear, tension, compression, thermal stress and strain. Learn the historic evolution, material, and system of structures, as well as the basic design and analysis tools for conceptual design. Prerequisites: PHYS 125 and MATH 108. Required text: Structure and Design: https://titles.cognella.com/structure-and-design.html/ Detailed information is also posted at http://www.usc.edu/structures/.
 
213bg
Building Structures and Seismic Design
Building Structures and Seismic Design

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 213a or equivalent course


Learn the design of basic structural systems: arch, vault, dome, truss, space truss, Vierendeel, suspended and stayed structures, moment frame, braced frame, shear wall, framed tube, bundled tube, and suspended high-rise. Structure selection and optimization is based on environmental conditions, available resources and technology. Explore how the design of these systems accounts for gravity, lateral wind, seismic load, and thermal stress and strain. Learn about seismic design and failure, as well as schematic design based on the global bending and shear concept. Students will design structures and build a structural model including small, medium, and large spaces.


Required text: Structure and Design https://titles.cognella.com/structure-and-design.html/


Detailed information is posted at http://www.usc.edu/structures/


 
214ag
World History of Architecture
World History of Architecture

Architecture is the product of social, cultural, religious, and political forces. Great cultures and civilizations have existed all over the world, producing not only great monuments but robust vernacular architectural traditions, closely tied to the environment and their local context, which resonate even today.


This course examines the history of architecture from the Prehistoric period through the 16th century from a global perspective.


 
214bg
World History of Architecture
World History of Architecture
Architecture is the product of social, cultural, religious, and political forces. Great cultures and civilizations have existed all over the world, producing not only great monuments but robust vernacular architectural traditions, closely tied to the environment and their local context, which resonate even today. This course examines the history of architecture from the Prehistoric period through the 16th century from a global perspective. Course Description: Arch 214a presents an overview of the history of architecture from the Prehistoric period through the 16th century from a global perspective. It is based on a five-part structure to ensure complete coverage. In alphabetical order, this is: (1) Africa (2) Asia (3) Europe (4) The Americas (5) West Asia. For clarity, this part of the survey will be divided into chronologically coherent groupings, related to discernable similarities, as well as three distinct sections, entitled I: The Search for Meaning in the Cosmos, II: The Rise and Fall of Empires, and III: The Age of Faiths.
 
215
Design for the Thermal and Atmospheric Environment
Design for the Thermal and Atmospheric Environment
Fueled​ ​by​ ​population​ ​growth,​ ​within​ ​the​ ​next​ ​twenty​ ​years​ ​-​ ​according​ ​to​ ​Architecture​ ​2030​ ​-​ ​​ ​the global​ ​built​ ​environment​ ​will​ ​​ ​be​ ​redesigned,​ ​added​ ​to,​ ​or​ ​remade,​ ​adding​ ​an​ ​area​ ​equal​ ​to​ ​3.5​ ​times the​ ​existing​ ​buildings​ ​of​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States​ ​(900​ ​billion​ ​square​ ​feet).​ ​​ ​In​ ​the​ ​process,​ ​energy​ ​patterns will​ ​be​ ​locked​ ​in​ ​for​ ​our​ ​cities,​ ​and​ ​as​ ​a​ ​result​ ​for​ ​our​ ​planet,​ ​for​ ​the​ ​following​ ​50​ ​years.​ ​​ ​​ ​If​ ​Climate Change​ ​is​ ​to​ ​be​ ​manageable​ ​and​ ​not​ ​catastrophic,​ ​future​ ​development​ ​must​ ​be​ ​defined​ ​by​ ​an awareness​ ​and​ ​a​ ​commitment​ ​to​ ​high​ ​performance,​ ​deep​ ​energy​ ​efficiency,​ ​and​ ​even​ ​carbon​ ​neutral design. During​ ​the​ ​past​ ​century,​ ​the​ ​architectural​ ​profession​ ​has​ ​moved,​ ​by​ ​and​ ​large,​ ​away​ ​from​ ​a​ ​centuries old​ ​awareness​ ​of​ ​the​ ​environment,​ ​a​ ​deeper​ ​understanding​ ​of​ ​local​ ​climates,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​knowledge​ ​of​ ​how to​ ​maintain​ ​balance​ ​between​ ​building​ ​and​ ​environment.​ ​​ ​As​ ​a​ ​result,​ ​deeper​ ​dependencies​ ​on mechanized​ ​heating​ ​and​ ​cooling,​ ​especially​ ​when​ ​buildings​ ​were​ ​designed​ ​with​ ​ingrained inefficiencies,​ ​became​ ​the​ ​norm​ ​and​ ​the​ ​solution​ ​to​ ​any​ ​problem.​ ​​ ​Energy​ ​use​ ​in​ ​buildings skyrocketed​ ​as​ ​a​ ​result,​ ​fueling​ ​the​ ​need​ ​for​ ​more​ ​power​ ​plants​ ​to​ ​supply​ ​energy​ ​for​ ​inefficient buildings​ ​and​ ​cities.​ ​​ ​For​ ​generations,​ ​this​ ​energy​ ​has​ ​been​ ​provided,​ ​by​ ​and​ ​large,​ ​by​ ​fossil​ ​fuel​ ​fired power​ ​plants,​ ​leading​ ​to​ ​increased​ ​CO2​ ​emissions.​ ​​ ​Recently,​ ​there​ ​has​ ​been​ ​a​ ​professional awakening​ ​around​ ​the​ ​role​ ​architects​ ​play​ ​in​ ​contributing​ ​to​ ​the​ ​problem​ ​of​ ​climate​ ​change.​ ​​ ​In​ ​the October,​ ​2003​ ​edition​ ​of​ ​Metropolis,​ ​Ed​ ​Mazria​ ​called​ ​out​ ​the​ ​profession​ ​pointing​ ​out​ ​that,​ ​“Architects Pollute”.​ ​​ ​In​ ​the​ ​immediate​ ​aftermath,​ ​the​ ​American​ ​Institute​ ​of​ ​Architects​ ​(AIA)​ ​brought​ ​focus​ ​to energy​ ​efficiency​ ​and​ ​sustainability​ ​-​ ​both​ ​of​ ​which​ ​are​ ​now​ ​core​ ​doctrines​ ​for​ ​the​ ​AIA. Architects​ ​see​ ​problems​ ​and​ ​solve​ ​problems.​ ​​ ​This​ ​is​ ​critically​ ​important​ ​when​ ​it​ ​comes​ ​to​ ​energy dependence​ ​and​ ​climate​ ​change.​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​We​ ​are​ ​are​ ​living​ ​through​ ​a​ ​time​ ​when​ ​the​ ​profession​ ​is​ ​in transition.​ ​​ ​Designing​ ​without​ ​understanding​ ​the​ ​impacts​ ​for​ ​energy,​ ​water​ ​and​ ​resource​ ​consumption is​ ​no​ ​longer​ ​possible.​ ​​ ​State​ ​and​ ​National​ ​Energy​ ​Codes​ ​now​ ​place​ ​limits​ ​on​ ​the​ ​amount​ ​of​ ​energy that​ ​can​ ​be​ ​used​ ​by​ ​buildings.​ ​​ ​This​ ​is​ ​a​ ​time​ ​of​ ​great​ ​challenge​ ​for​ ​architects​ ​(and​ ​future​ ​architects). It​ ​is​ ​also​ ​a​ ​time​ ​of​ ​great​ ​opportunity. This​ ​course​ ​will​ ​discuss​ ​Climate​ ​Change​ ​and​ ​the​ ​critical​ ​role​ ​architects​ ​play​ ​in​ ​the​ ​discussion​ ​in​ ​the context​ ​of​ ​understanding​ ​and​ ​designing​ ​for​ ​the​ ​thermal​ ​environment​ ​of​ ​buildings.​ ​​ ​Through​ ​the semester,​ ​students​ ​will​ ​discuss​ ​and​ ​review​ ​basic​ ​concepts​ ​of​ ​sustainability,​ ​gaining​ ​an​ ​understanding of​ ​climate​ ​appropropriate​ ​design,​ ​passive​ ​heating​ ​and​ ​cooling,​ ​and​ ​renewable​ ​energy​ ​systems.​ ​​ ​At the​ ​same​ ​time,​ ​through​ ​weekly​ ​readings​ ​and​ ​assignments,​ ​students​ ​will​ ​use​ ​tools​ ​to​ ​help​ ​them understand,​ ​measure​ ​and​ ​design​ ​better​ ​buildings.​ ​​ ​They​ ​will​ ​be​ ​exposed​ ​to​ ​and​ ​will​ ​learn​ ​the international​ ​language​ ​of​ ​sustainability. During​ ​the​ ​semester,​ ​students​ ​will​ ​explore​ ​concepts​ ​and​ ​test​ ​ideas,​ ​building​ ​a​ ​single​ ​building​ ​(design and​ ​climate​ ​assigned​ ​by​ ​the​ ​instructor)​ ​to​ ​test​ ​passive​ ​energy​ ​features,​ ​evaluate​ ​daylighting,​ ​and ultimately​ ​to​ ​design​ ​a​ ​Zero​ ​Net​ ​Energy​ ​Building.
 
220
The Architect's Sketchbook
The Architect's Sketchbook
The ability to sketch is the ability to visualize and transfer that vision, from your mind, to your hand, to the paper. The sketchbook is an important part of the process of design as a place to audition new ideas. Students will develop skills to observe, perceive, and authoritatively document space in order to better understand architecture and the built environment. Sites around the city that have historical or contemporary architectural significance will serve as inspiration. Course Description: The intention of this course is to enable students to develop a passion for sketching and the essential graphic skills to fulfill their aspirations. The ability to “to sketch what you see”, “to understand what you see”, and to “love what you see”, underscores the fascination and beauty of the sketchbook and the visual curiosity of it’s author. It is the sketch that enters directly into the soul of the viewer, enabling them to see everyday things, hitherto never seen before! Sketching will enrich your ability to envision your surroundings quickly, and let you share your visions with others. Sketching is very personal and you will develop your own visual vocabulary as an expression of your interest and skills. In addition to the preliminary list of principles described, each class will have one overriding rule for sketching.
 
302aL
Architectural Design III
Architectural Design III
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 202bL
 
302bL
Architectural Design III
Architectural Design III
The integration of architectural design with building systems, both material (structure and enclosure) and experiential (circulation and environment), is the focus of this final core sequence studio. The comprehensive design project requires students to implement all the knowledge and skills previously accumulated, to extend the depth and breadth of their understanding of design issues, and to deal definitively with the interaction of the formal, experiential, regulatory, and technical requirements of architectural design. Projects will provide for structural integrity, for ventilation, heating and cooling (both natural and mechanical), for natural and artificial lighting, and for acoustic amenity. Students must build into their designs life-safety, egress, and accessibility requirements as embodied in model building codes. Developing a portion of each project in detail and extrapolating those tectonics, students will be responsible for integrating program, site and formal analyses, comprehending the ways in which decisions made in each sphere inform the others.
 
303
Principles of Spatial Design I
Principles of Spatial Design I
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 203 Introduction to design principles and processes; sequence of exercises emphasizing development of basic skills, ideas, and techniques used in the creation of simplified urban space design projects.
 
304x
Intensive Survey Prehistory to the Present
Intensive Survey Prehistory to the Present
Examine the evolution of the built environment as a representation of people’s symbolic, economic, political, and physical ideals from prehistory to today. The course intends to provide a fundamental method for understanding how people use architecture to present meaning and intention. The aim is to help non-majors develop visual literacy about the built environment and will include study of pseudo-historical buildings in the greater Los Angeles area. An intensive historical overview of architecture from prehistory to the present, emphasizing interrelationships of various global cultures and how social considerations were translated into form. Not avail­able for credit to architecture majors.
 
305aL
Building Science II
Building Science II
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 205abL Sufficient overview of the wood, steel, concrete designs and detailing would be provided to the students during the course for them to complete required engineering task. In addition, wind and seismic provisions from current building code would be presented during the course to help students to apply theory to practice.
 
305bL
Building Science II
Building Science II
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 305aL During this course, students will explore design alternatives of various architectural structures using wood, steel, masonry, and concrete materials with emphasis on lateral load design using Rigid Diaphragms. Sufficient overview of the wood, steel, masonry, concrete designs and detailing would be provided to the students during the course for them to complete required engineering task. In addition, wind and seismic provisions from current building code would be presented during the course to help students to apply theory to practice.
 
306m
Shelter
Shelter
“We shape our buildings: thereafter they shape us.” Sir Winston Churchill This course asks a seemingly simple question – What is Shelter? The answer however, is quite complex. It is typically thought that man designs shelter based on physical opportunities and constraints (i.e. climate, materials, construction, etc). However, reliance on physical factors alone to create shelter is a gross oversimplification. Man is a social being, operating within complex belief systems, family structures, social organization, cultural milieus, etc. This course posits that it is these powerful social and cultural factors, rather than the physical factors, which truly drive the creation of shelter. This course delves into the tremendous impact and implications social class and poverty have on the creation of shelter. Students will learn the numerous ways social class and poverty manifest as we examine life and shelter in refugee camps, urban slums, homeless camps and post-disaster housing. Students will learn how man endures throughout time and space; and finds ways not only to survive, but also to thrive. This course fulfills the USC Diversity Requirement.
 
307
Digital Tools for Architecture
Digital Tools for Architecture
Building information modeling (BIM) is a digital paradigm shift, in many ways similar to that of the CAD revolution of the 1980s. What is BIM? How is it different from CAD? Why does an architecture student need to know about it? This course provides an introduction to BIM from the viewpoint of the architect (Revit Architecture), engineer (Revit Structure and Revit Mechanical), and contractor (Navisworks, Bluebeam). Depending on time, other software such as Fuzor or Stingray (BIM in a game engine), Fusion (rapid prototyping), FormIt (conceptual modeling), or Dynamo (visual programming) will be explored. Guest lecturers will speak on current digital issues facing the architecture profession. Please feel free to contact the instructor for more information.
 
313
Design of Building Structures
Design of Building Structures
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 213a Integrate theories and knowledge from basic structural analysis and construction materials courses into practical design solutions for contemporary building structures. Develop your capacity to explain and interpret information related to the fundamental principles and structural behavior of modern buildings in withstanding gravity, wind, earthquake, and other environmental forces. Analyze the structural characteristics of common construction materials, i.e., wood, steel, concrete, masonry, and light gauge metal and learn to integrate structural elements into complete structural systems in modern buildings. Objectives: ARCH313 seeks to integrate theories and knowledge acquired from ARCH 213 into practical design solutions for contemporary building structures. Our goal is to help you develop your capacity to classify, compare, summarize, explain and interpret information related to: - Fundamental principles and structural behavior of modern buildings in withstanding gravity, lateral (especially seismic and wind), and other environmental forces - The evolution, range, and appropriate application of contemporary structural systems - Structural characteristics of common construction materials, i.e., wood, steel, concrete, masonry, and light gauge metal - Integration of structural elements into complete structural systems in modern building design - Good professional practice in assembling structural design documents, including calculations, drawings, and specifications - Fundamentals of building costs, such as acquisition, project financing and funding, financial feasibility, operational costs, and construction estimating with an emphasis on life-cycle cost accounting. Understanding of the materials discussed in this class will adequately prepare you to pass the Structural Systems (SS) portion of the NCARB Architect Registration Examination (ARE).
 
314
History of Architecture Contemporary Issues
History of Architecture Contemporary Issues
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 214b The readings and assignments are designed to encourage critical thinking and analytical skills, in addition to an understanding of the criticisms leveled against the modern movement during the 1960s.
 
315
Design for the Luminous and Sonic Environment
Design for the Luminous and Sonic Environment
Ideas, problems, and computations related to the design of buildings in response to the luminous and sonic environment.
 
316
Place and Culture
Place and Culture
The goal of this seminar is to understand the cultural context of Spain, by examining its architecture, history, political and economic developments. Beginning in Madrid and travelling north, we will visit cities and landscapes and examine the variety of influences that determine their form. In Barcelona we will analyze the city’s major urban and architectural sites, topography, and systems of urban organization. We will examine Barcelona’s architectural practices that challenge and engage European traditional and modernist orthodoxies and its culture committed to design. In Southern Spain, we will examine cities shaped by a coexistence of different influences (Jewish, Christian, Muslim) and others dominated by one. While certain aspects of the built environment are intentional, others are not. How did a theory of urban and architectural design emerge in Spain, and where did it come from? What constitutes a “cultural geography” of place?
 
370
Architectural Studies- Expanding the Field
Architectural Studies- Expanding the Field
Architecture 370, Introduction to Architectural Studies, provides a thorough overview of the content and value of architectural education. Students will learn about the various modes of architectural education, internship and practice. ARCH 370 introduces the broad range of opportunities, specializations, and related professions that an architectural education can enable. For the four-year degree in Architectural Studies, a resource for professional growth in the Bachelor of Architecture five-year program, and an introduction to the profession of architecture for the non-major. No special background or skills are required that would place non-majors at a disadvantage. With successful completion of this course, students will have been personally exposed to and investigated a variety of professional options within traditional architectural practice, within the development and construction industry and within a variety of associated professional fields. Successful professionals will share first-hand accounts of their unique careers that resulted from their interest in architecture. You will have the opportunity to hear what it takes to get there from here and to ask questions of a wide variety of leading professionals.
 
402aL
Architectural Design IV
Architectural Design IV
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 302bL A collection can be a lot of things, in fashion and design, it suggests a family resemblance between a series of objects, either acquired or designed over an extended period of time. A collection has a temporal relationship with space and time, it can reflect a variety of styles, and set predictions for upcoming social and cultural trends. A collection offers unique organizational, generative potentialities, as well as, spatial adaptive qualities. The studio seeks to investigate and re-interpret furniture collections as generative aggregate systems of growth that can define space. How can an “Urban furniture collection” generate a spatial framework that can multiply/grow/morph/change in reaction to future social and cultural occupations?
 
402bL
Architectural Design IV
Architectural Design IV
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 402aL Selected areas of specialization; three projects chosen with advisement from a variety of studio offerings that concentrate on different areas of vital concern.
 
403
Principles of Spatial Design II
Principles of Spatial Design II
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 303 Emphasis is on developing advanced urban spatial design solutions set within contemporary urban conditions, with a particular emphasis on ecology, public space, neighborhoods and districts
 
404
Topics in Modern Architecture in Southern California
Topics in Modern Architecture in Southern California
Architecture 404 examines the impact of the environment, culture and politics on the evolution of architecture and urban planning in Southern California in the 20th century. It explores the interchange between European modernism and local vernacular influences as they came together to create new regional architectural and urban forms. Lectures examine a series of case studies in order to more closely explore the complexity of these developments. There are few regions in the world more exciting to explore the scope of twentieth-century architecture than in Southern California. It is here that European and Asian influences combined with the local environment, culture, politics, and vernacular traditions to create an entirely new vocabulary of regional architecture and urban form. Lecture topics range from the stylistic influences of the Arts and Crafts movement and European Modernism to the impact on architecture and planning of the automobile, World War II, and the USC School of Architecture during the 1950s.
 
405aL
Building Science III
Building Science III
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 305abL Design of building systems as an experimental process.
 
405bL
Building Science III
Building Science III
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 405aL Design of building systems as an experimental process.
 
406
Global Studies Topics in Architecture, Urbanism, History & Art
Global Studies Topics in Architecture, Urbanism, History & Art
In preparation for the spring semester in Italy, this two-unit course introduces students to Italian history, to the history of Italian architecture, and to Italian culture. It includes a section on the history of Northern Europe. It prepares students for living in Italy in the Spring 2013 semester, for learning to interrogate and analyze diverse urban cultures, and for adapting to a different culture and language.
 
407
Advanced Computer Applications
Advanced Computer Applications
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 207 and ARCH 307, CADD studio or department/faculty approval. Our material world is primarily produced by a method in which design, analysis, representation, fabrication and assembly is a seamless process - with the glaring exception of the building industry. Until recently, the building industry has rejected this methodology and instead relied upon a traditional project delivery method- a method that has increasingly separated the architect from the building process. This separation thus necessitated the production of two-dimensional representations by the architect in order to communicate the design intent to a third party builder. Whether by tradition or necessity, the notational limitations of the plan/section/elevation representation has remained the primary method by which the architect communicates design. But as architects are increasingly exploring more complex forms, it has become crucial to find design and production methodologies to realize these projects in the built environment without incurring the information loss inherent in traditional design representations. Essential to this course is an understanding of how the increased efficiencies of software and emerging fabrication techniques are changing the way built projects can potentially be realized. This is a fundamental shift away from utilizing the computer as a visualization/documenting tool, and moving toward recognizing the computer as a generative tool. This course will utilize CAD/CAM technologies for the design, visualization, and production of components and fixtures. As a point of reference, we will explore product design and related industries as a microcosm of the larger issues facing the production of architectural assemblies. Lectures on these topics are accompanied by software and machine demos, in-class exercises and assignments that introduce both the digital as well as the fabrication environments. Lastly, students are encouraged to explore design communication techniques that move away from hyper-realistic rendering and toward the formation of an individual style.
 
409L
Design Foundation
Design Foundation
Introduction to basic architectural design principles for problem solving scenario. It is a foundation level architectural design course for systematic thinking.
 
410
Computer Transformations (Essential Digital Design Techniques)
Computer Transformations (Essential Digital Design Techniques)
Course Objectives: integrating digital operational strategies into a design method. Commanding the ability to fluidly navigate through a vast array of virtual applications, design media, and digital fabrication technologies, affords incredible potential to develop, test, produce and communicate both spatial ideas and their corresponding physical components with great clarity. This course is designed to provide a fundamental introduction to three-dimensional digital modeling for architectural representation and fabrication using Rhinoceros 3d - a NURBS surface modeling program. We will intensively focus on a specific region within this array: design strategies / techniques used by contemporary architects as a way to organize and test operational strategies used in digital design process through the use of complex NURBS constructs developed, and refined in digital tools introduced in this course
 
411
Architectural Technology
Architectural Technology
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 313 Technology is presented not as a post-facto application enabling an architectural idea, but as one of many modes of concurrent thinking an architect must develop. This course promotes understanding the logics and details of construction technologies as they contribute to the production of architecture. Both conventions and experimentations in building assemblies will be studied to link technical considerations to design development. Focus on emerging technologies and concerns, along with proven techniques and means, will encourage awareness of all facets of constructional potentials. Students will learn fundamental detailing principles, and implement those principles in order to test through making. Possibilities and limitations of various constructional systems will be explored, with an eye towards seeing assembly systems as the nexus of various kinds of performance.
 
414
Perspectives in History and Theory in Architecture - Architecture and Natural Disaster
Perspectives in History and Theory in Architecture - Architecture and Natural Disaster

FACULTY: Jason Nguyen


We are living in perilous times, with the threat of wildfires, hurricanes, and droughts occurring with increased frequency. This seminar examines architecture, landscape, and urbanism when confronted with natural disaster. How has the risk of fires, earthquakes, floods, tornadoes, and extreme hot and cold impacted the ways that architects and designers understand the built environment in theory and practice? What roles have architecture, landscape, and urbanism played in embodying and even exacerbating these catastrophes? How has the fear of destruction altered our conceptions of nature and culture, including their relationship to politics, science, philosophy, and religion?


We begin by questioning the relationship between nature, culture, and disaster across a range of disciplines, periods, and geographies. From here, the remaining sessions are organized according to different disasters and their relationship with architecture, landscape, and urbanism. The aim of the seminar is to illustrate how concepts of nature and culture (of which architecture is a part) are intimately linked to the ecological realities of their time. Similarly, the way we respond to nature—including the architectural tactics we employ for protection—reveals a great deal about our own cultural reality. The seminar ends by speculating on the current environmental crisis, including the roles played by architecture, technology, and globalization.

 
414
Perspectives in History and Theory in Architecture - Architectures of Occupation and Resistance
Perspectives in History and Theory in Architecture - Architectures of Occupation and Resistance

What does the architecture of buildings and cities tell us about systematic oppression and political control? What options for resistance exist in deeply entrenched spaces and structures of domination and dispossession? In this course, we will explore how the design of the built environment is shaped by social hierarchies and political agendas. In addition, we will examine how occupation and resistance are in constant flux, and how the dispossessed manage to find ways to act politically and resist strategies of domination through their everyday spatial practices and tactics.

 

The course aims to:

  • demonstrate the relevance of architecture and planning perspectives to the study of power and resistance in modern society;
  • signify the design of the built environment as not only a technical process, but also as a product of political motivations and social hierarchies;
  • introduce tools needed to decipher social beliefs systems and political agendas underlying various architectural and planning schemes.

 

 
414
Perspectives in History and Theory in Architecture-Housing, Infrastructure, Citizenship
Perspectives in History and Theory in Architecture-Housing, Infrastructure, Citizenship

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 214a, ARCH 214b or ARCH 304 How do architectures and infrastructures both support and limit capacities for political community and economic-political enfranchisement? Modern housing has been understood, on the one hand, as providing the basic foundations of citizenship and cultural integration and, on the other hand, as an instrument of biopolitical management, segregation, and financial exploitation. How does a house function as an instrument of citizenship (and non-citizenship): firstly by mediating between the private sphere and the state, and secondly by its production of interdependencies (i.e., through the house's interpolation within infrastructures of education, communication, transportation, health care, and physical services)?


Special attention will be given to how the design of housing has worked co-operatively with economic redevelopment in urban and rural areas to produce a range of political effects. This course has a global scope but with a special emphasis on U.S. histories of slavery, settler colonialism, industrial labor, immigration, and civil rights. The course will be grounded in philosophical texts that theorize citizenship and non-citizenship.

 
414
Perspectives in History and Theory in Architecture- Sacred Spaces
Perspectives in History and Theory in Architecture- Sacred Spaces
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 214a, ARCH 214b or ARCH 304 Part seminar and part lecture, this class addresses questions concerning spaces defined as sacred. Who defines them, when, why, where: these are the general questions with which the course begins. What does 'sacred' mean in the context of different types of spaces? On what basis do individuals or groups decide that a site is sacred, and on what authority? Many such spaces end up being contested, for a variety of reasons. The subject opens up multiple possibilities, many of which we will examine in detail beginning with a series of lectures followed by discussions of historical examples of sacred spaces. *SPRING 2018: The first meeting of this course will be Monday, January 29. There will be a total of 8 meetings at 2 hours 50 minutes each. The meeting dates may be found on the sample syllabus.
 
414
Perspectives in History and Theory in Architecture - The Environment: Representing and Knowing the Global Sphere
Perspectives in History and Theory in Architecture - The Environment: Representing and Knowing the Global Sphere

Going beyond the scope of sustainable design, this course examines how new aesthetic and spatial practices helped conjure into existence the thing that we now call “the environment”. Students will examine how aesthetics, architectures, and modes of ordering the world’s plenitude helped enable the environment to become a dominant paradigm for comprehending economic, human, and non-human interactions during the latter half of the twentieth century. Given that the environment can be neither strictly delimited nor perceived in its full complexity and scope, it had to be construed through new visual modes and technologies of representation and through new terms and concepts.


Proposing that by the 1960s the environment had subsumed antecedent world-models, this course turns backward to colonial conceptions of nature, cartography, race, and natural history and proceeds into the twentieth century to see how these concepts were absorbed within and transformed by the construct of the environment. We will see the emergence of two twentieth-century environmental paradigms: on the one hand, the management of large-scale world-systems; on the other hand “environmental design” at the scale of buildings, rooms, and media that sought to instate cognitive-behavioral changes in occupants. We will examine how modes of representation are crucial to issues of environmental justice.

 
414
Perspectives in History and Theory of Architecture - Landscape Imaginary
Perspectives in History and Theory of Architecture - Landscape Imaginary
This seminar offers a cross-cultural introduction to ideas of nature, landscape, and the environment. By focusing on “the landscape imaginary,” this course is primarily interested in excavating the mental constructs and cognitive mappings that have shaped attitudes toward the environment in a variety of cultures at a number of discrete historical moments, from antiquity to the present. The seminar makes use of primary sources (both written and visual) to analyze, compare, and contrast an array of key concepts including arcadia, paradise, forest, mountain, villa, landscape, wilderness, land, system, ecology, wasteland, and matter. Our aim will be to develop a critical understanding of categories that have shaped and continue to shape the ways in which we perceive, understand, react to, picture, and design our surroundings at a variety of scales, from the local to the global (and beyond).
 
414
Perspectives in the History and Theory of Architecture - Modern Architecture in Theory
Perspectives in the History and Theory of Architecture - Modern Architecture in Theory

This course examines and interrogates the concept of Modernism by focusing on a select number of key texts. Rather than offering a survey of the Modern Movement, this course looks closely at the writings produced by some of its central figures, including Adolf Loos, Antonio Sant'Elia, Bruno Taut, Walter Gropius, and Le Corbusier, as well as some of its earliest challengers. Themes and topics addressed include definitions of modernism and avant-garde; art, craft, and industry; new materials such as iron, glass, and concrete; the question of ornament; the modern metropolis; and the modern landscape.

 
418
Designing with Natural Forces
Designing with Natural Forces
A look at the past, present, and (possible) future of buildings that respond to natural forces. Lecture and discussion classes will examine the history of designing with natural forces with an eye to adapting these techniques into current and future work. The semester project will apply the concepts discussed in class to a hypothetical construction in a location with extreme natural forces. Students will leave the class with a practical understanding of natural forces, as well as their impact on the design process and the built environment at large.
 
419
Architectural Sustainability Tools and Methods
Architectural Sustainability Tools and Methods
What is sustainable design? How do you do it? And how do you know when you have succeeded? With the mainstream acceptance of the green building movement, an increasing number of buildings are promoted as examples of green or sustainable design. However, many “green” buildings do not live up to even basic expectations for resource efficiency, are expensive and accessible to only a small fraction of the population, create environments that are unhealthy, have life-spans that are short-lived due to their inability to adapt to changing end-user needs, and fail to create a meaningful sense of place or community. Defining sustainability requires accounting for the complex interaction of cultural, political, economic and ecological issues encompassing each project. And, it requires understanding how intervention at the scale of a single project can work to support outcomes at the scale of the street, neighborhood, district and beyond. This course begins by setting the context of the present crisis and the complex interconnections that exist. We will then attempt to dismantle the preconceived, incorrect understandings of “green” design and develop appropriate, fundamental principles for a sustainable built environment through a critical examination of existing sustainability metrics and rating systems. Throughout the semester, the course will establish knowledge of sustainable design principles through exploration of central concepts (e.g. resource efficiency, environmental responsiveness, adaptability, life-cycle assessment, place / placelessness), case studies of innovative projects, software tools, and self-directed research. In addition to Los Angeles, a range of urban (and urbanizing) locations across the world will serve as laboratories for investigation. The final third of the semester will be spent examining how specific sustainability performance objectives and strategies can be applied to develop innovative and holistic architectural proposals.
 
420
Visual Communication and Graphic Expression New Forms and Concepts
Visual Communication and Graphic Expression New Forms and Concepts

An exploratory study of fundamental and innovative visual communication principles and graphic expression techniques to facilitate the design enquiry process for architects. 



Prerequisite(s): ARCH 302bL


Registration Restriction: Not open to students with Freshman/Sophomore standing.


In the past two decades, architecture has undergone a paradigm shift that influences the way we think about and approach issues of communication, representation, and production. Clearly, the new breed of computational tools and digital modeling programs offer students and practitioners alike opportunities for experimentation with new graphic forms and visual concepts. In a global networked culture that often places emphasis on “instant communication”—texting, tweeting, email, LED billboards, urban screens, Skype, social media, YouTube, etc., the IMAGE or SOUNDBITE has acquired a newfound significance as the de facto means of communication that’s unparalleled. Explore what bearing this paradigmatic change has on the practice of architecture, both as a medium and as a discipline and how these advances in technology shape our visual culture and impact the relationship between the medium and message.

 
421
Digital Architectural Photography
Digital Architectural Photography
All architecture students can prosper by learning to see light and how light alters the visual impact of architectural forms. Just as drawing allows students to refine their vision and perspective teaches how we see, the camera allows for yet another discipline to organically create with architecture and light. This course will teach students to create successful images of exterior architecture, interior architectural design, as well as architectural models. The student will become a highly competent creative digital photographic image creator with accurate exposure, proper color correction, and excellent printing output. They will successfully use specific digital tools for the architectural image (free-transform/HDR) to correct distortion and capture mixed lighting with multiple exposures. Students will be able to utilize light, structures and Adobe Lightroom in new ways. Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course each student will possess the following skills: Comprehensive understanding of architectural lighting. Heightened sensitivity to light and how it strengthens architectural design Ability to use High Dynamic Range (HDR): multiple exposures to create dramatic architecture/interior images without additional professional lighting. Control of Parallax (Free Transform Procedure) to correct distortion and perspective so buildings do not look like they are leaning to one side or falling back. Intermediate ability to photograph architectural models and small products, including a studio set up with studio lighting and possibly strobe lighting. Creation of exceptional images with light and architecture, including dusk imagery. Advanced amateur use of most Single Lens Reflex (SLR) digital camera functions, including: shooting raw, processing in Adobe Bridge and Photoshop CS6, batch processing, organization, color temperature, exposure/histograms, color management (curves/levels). Advanced use and knowledge of Adobe Lightroom 5. Knowledge of how to do a monitor calibration. Advanced eleven color profiled printing.
 
422
Architectural Photography- Film and Digital
Architectural Photography- Film and Digital
Explore another facet of photography through both film and digital media. Whether as a tourist or as a professional, the close observation and documentation of the built environment is a valuable skill. Learn to “see” light and how light alters the visual impact of architectural forms. Become a master of high-resolution images utilizing 35mm film cameras, 35mm Digital SLR cameras and 4x5 large format Sinar architectural film cameras with perspective/parallax control. Master Adobe Lightroom 5 including flawless workflow in the “Library” module and creative image enhancement in the “Develop” module. Photo manipulation using other current software will also be included.
 
423
Light, Color and the Character of Material
Light, Color and the Character of Material

Does not require D-Clearance.


Registration restriction: Not open to students with Freshman/Sophomore standing.


This seminar examines light, color and the character of material as a collection of medium for making worlds. Through linking various arts and design disciplines as a departure and overview for the course subject, Arch 423 exposes students to a spectrum of approaches in theory and application, drawing influences from nature, technology, and the vernacular. Class exercises aim to develop a number of visual concerns across object-oriented analysis to atmospheric and environmental construction. In the course of employing digital and analogue techniques, students will synthesize a repertoire of advanced graphic experiments for weekly progress and learning.

 
424L
Field Studies in Architecture
Field Studies in Architecture
Assignments rely principally on field trips and field research, while additional readings, class discussions and research will be utilized to develop a body of information and method of critique. Field research will focus on the first-hand observation, analysis, and documentation of existing buildings and their contexts so that lessons-learned can inform the design methodology applied in studio. Students will be challenged to articulate their analyses with respect to the specific urban, temporal, and cultural contexts. There will be ten assignments for each course: nine specific assignments and one assignment that you may choose the subject of yourself.
 
425L
Field Studies in Urbanism
Field Studies in Urbanism
The focus of ARCH 425 is on urban spaces, including parks, plazas, and urban(re)development projects. The field study of these urban spaces also provides an opportunity to understand the complex role of the architect-designer in the design of urban spaces. As a critical component of the urban environment, landscape architecture will be an important aspect of this class. These investigations will employ analytical methods, representational techniques, and speculative inquiry into the fundamental spatial and infra-structural elements of the city. Your research will be documented and communicated through mapping, plans/sections/elevations, diagrams, photo documentation and text.
 
426L
Field Studies in Tectonics
Field Studies in Tectonics
Buildings embody a series of performative criteria that form the fundamental motives for an architectural task. These functions are critical considerations in building design and are accomplished within the context of technological and economic possibilities. The focus of the course will be on technology in architecture, with an emphasis on structure, materiality, construction, material and assembly, and sustainability. Using annotated photo documentation, notations, and diagrams these criteria will be analyzed to explore how technology affects the form, the assembly of the architectural response, and, ultimately, how technology is integrated into the methodology of accomplishing the greater architectural goals of the building.
 
439
Landscape Architecture Media Workshop
Landscape Architecture Media Workshop
Introductory media workshop for new landscape architecture students in the 3-year graduate program. Topics include: hand drawing, measuring, architectural drawings, computer software tutorials, and field trips.
 
440m
Literature and the Urban Experience
Literature and the Urban Experience
What is Los Angeles? This has been a key question for a city that both exhilarates and confounds. Commonly derided as a landscape without history, Los Angeles is (as all cities are) part of a trajectory where past and future collapse into the present. How can we make sense of a place so defined by tropes and cliches? One way is to examine what these visions say about the city as it exists today. In this class, literature will be the lens through which we come to know Los Angeles. This is an exciting time to be in L.A., given the development of public transportation and pedestrian corridors, as well as L.A.’s sense of itself as a more connected, coherent city - less a loose collection of communities than a true metropolis. This is not a new idea; it goes back to the Los Angeles of 100 years ago. How did L.A., then, lose and regain sight of itself? What is the meaning of its circular evolution? To get at some answers, we will use Writing Los Angeles: A Literary Anthology, a collection of writings from Southern California that spans 100 years. Here, many of the city's signature texts and authors (Joan Didion, Wanda Coleman, Raymond Chandler, Walter Mosley) address the city from differing viewpoints. We will read these texts with a kind of double vision, looking at them both with respect to what they meant in their own time and what they mean now. In addition, we will apply a historiographer's perspective to talk about which texts have survived and which haven’t, and what this means for us vis-à-vis the city’s legibility. The editor of this important anthology, David Ulin (professor at USC’s Dornsife School), will guest-teach several of the classes. We will also read Ulin’s Sidewalking: Coming to Terms with Los Angeles, a companion of sorts to Writing Los Angeles that makes a critical argument about the city L.A. seems primed to become. In the middle ground between the stories and the streets of the city, we will discover something not just about this landscape, but also about its soul. And in the process of looking into its future, we will be joined by a second guest teacher, Greg Goldin. Finally, we will read Nina Revoyr's novel The Age of Dreaming, watch some seminal films that take place in Los Angeles, and feature a number of additional invited lecturers who will widen our conversation to encompass many of the hidden corners, geographical and otherwise, of Los Angeles.
 
442m
Women's Spaces in History "Hussies, Harems & Housewives"
Women's Spaces in History "Hussies, Harems & Housewives"
How cultures divide and occupy spaces throughout history reflect a diverse range of status differences, differences as apparent in pre-industrial as in postindustrial revolution societies. This course explores spatial differentiation from the perspective of gender. From the intimacy of the home to the larger rural or urban community, patterns of spatial differentiation reinforced unequal status based upon gender and made it more difficult for women to achieve equality. Spatial differentiation in the modern era has extended from the home to educational facilities to the workplace to the city as a whole, and it has marginalized women along with other groups. We will specifically consider the role of gender relations in the formation of the built environment, both the public and the private spheres. We examine spatial differentiation and its practice in ancient, pre-modern, and modern cultures. The focus is upon the expression of that differentiation in the house, workplace, and public sphere, but we also explore the responses of women to the systems of oppression manifested through spatial differentiation. Because this class meets University requirements for diversity courses, it is also concerned with ways in which relations of domination are concealed or suppressed. We employ methodologies from history, anthropology, architecture and sociology to understand the nuances of domination through spatial differentiation. We study the institutional structures that underlie spatial organization, who benefits and who is deprived by specific socio-spatial arrangements, the assumptions of scholars who have studied diverse cultures and their buildings, and how they conceived of gender relations. The films that we view have a two-fold purpose: on the one hand, they help illustrate spatial practices in non-western cultures, in pre-modern times, and in our own culture; on the other, the films enable us to discern how to decode gendered spatial practices in the visual realm.
 
444
Great Houses of Los Angeles
Great Houses of Los Angeles
Experience the work of seven noteworthy architects (Greene and Greene, Wright, Schindler, Neutra, Eames, Koenig, and Lautner) who practiced in southern California in the early to middle 20th century. By visiting their classic houses--often considered to be among the most innovative examples of housing design in the US - students gain a deep understanding of the design ideas and principles embedded in these settings. Students will study each house’s significance through critical readings that reveal the architect's ideas and the impact of these places on the evolution of architecture. Saturday site visits of ten southern California houses designed by these master architects allow students to study and interpret the meaning of the architect's intentions through direct experience. Site visits, selected readings, class discussion, and lectures are used to explore a range of issues. Course faculty Victor Regnier, FAIA, is a teacher, researcher, and architect who has focused his academic and professional life on the design of housing and community settings for older people. He holds a joint professorship between the USC School of Architecture and the Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, which is the only joint appointment of this type in the US. He is also the only person to have achieved fellowship status in both the American Institute of Architects and the Gerontological Society of America. From 1992 until 1996 he served as USC’s Dean of the School of Architecture. Consistently one of the most popular courses in the School of Architecture, this course takes you behind the scenes in some of the most interesting houses in Los Angeles with a renowned expert in the field.
 
447
Ecological Factors in Design
Ecological Factors in Design
Lectures, laboratory exercises and field trips introduce basic knowledge of incoporating ecological factors in urban design and interaction of landscape science with the human environment. The course will concentrate on both the history and theory of urban ecological design and on the, computing tools currently available to undertake quantitative (and usually spatial) analysis of the effects, of alternative urban designs. In this sense, the course is situated both within landscape ecology and urban, ecology and also in the applied disciplines of planning and architecture, and therefore is part of the newly, identified domain of “geodesign.”
 
454
Contemporary Asian Architecture
Contemporary Asian Architecture
Exploration of various “Asian” architectures, comparisons of areas, identifying current trends and impact of Asia on Southern California and Los Angeles.
 
470A
Architectural Studies Capstone- Preparation and Framework
Architectural Studies Capstone- Preparation and Framework
This course is the first in a two-part, capstone sequence designed especially for degree candidates in the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies program. The course is structured to assist students in identifying and investigating a subject consistent with their curricular concentration and relevant to their professional and academic goals. The course will bring students together in a seminar format to achieve three central goals: to provide a thorough introduction to research methodology, to foster proficiency in scholarly writing, and to develop an individual topic of inquiry. The course begins by discussing approaches to scholarly writing and documenting work, citation of information, and the identification of source material specific to each student’s curricular concentration. Then, working sequentially, students will identify a topic of inquiry, organize a literature review, develop a thesis statement, and write an abstract. Students will use the work they generate in this course to establish the basis for a capstone research paper to be executed in ARCH 470b. The 470ab sequence aims to imbue students with a love of, and understanding of, research and how to do it. In this way, the course positions itself as both capstone and threshold. It attempts to culminate a 4-year academic course of study, while simultaneously generating a personal research framework that can be further developed in graduate school and/or help launch a professional career.
 
470B
Architectural Studies Capstone- Seminar
Architectural Studies Capstone- Seminar
This course is the second in a two-part, capstone sequence designed especially for degree candidates in the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies program. The course will bring students together in a seminar format to develop an individual directed research paper with a critical focus/agenda that represents both a reflection of the BSAS program content and a rigorous investigation of the individual students’ focus and interests , as explored in ARCH 470a. In addition, students will be challenged to critically examine this subject within the broader framework of contemporary architectural discourse and related disciplines. A series of readings will introduce texts as examples of research involving architectural studies within a larger intellectual context. The readings will serve as a platform for both group and individual discussions. In addition, students will have the opportunity to develop significant presentation skills through a series of focused Pecha Kucha-style presentations. Students will meet one-on-one with the instructor for suggestions, guidance and paper edits. Students will also benefit from the counsel and collaboration of structured writing groups. Writing groups will be assembled loosely into themes, based on research topic s. Writing groups provide a constant source of constructive criticism, support, and encouragement for each member. The 470ab sequence aims to imbue students with a love of, and understanding of, research and how to do it. In this way, the course positions itself as both capstone and threshold. It attempts to culminate a 4- year academic course of study, while simultaneously generating a personal research framework that can be further developed in graduate school and/or help launch a professional career.
 
481
Furniture Design
Furniture Design
Explore the intersection of architecture, art, and design in this hands-on furniture design course. Four influential early 20th century movements (futurism, neo-plasticism, modernism, and constructivism) explored ideas relating to the changing nature of society, technology, industrialization, new discoveries, and invention. Artists and architects were interested in utilizing the newest materials, construction, and joining methods, as well as innovative finishing techniques. Steel and metalworking were at the forefront of this exploration. This course will look closely at furniture designed by a variety of architects and artists, ranging from Pierre Chareau to Ludwig Mies van der Rohe to Charles and Ray Eames. More contemporary design works and interpretations (Peter Pearce, Morphosis, Richard Meier, and Herman Miller) will also be discussed. Students will design and fabricate metal furniture.
 
499
Informed Form
Informed Form
This is a design research seminar that will explore the relevance of architectural form as a product of discovery by exploring the reciprocity between form (geometry), force (performance), matter (organization), and craft (fabrication). It investigates and extends the design research legacies of analogue form-finding in the works of Frei Otto, Antonio Gaudi, Heinz Isler, and Felix Candela by exploring digital and analogue techniques for discovering form through variable material and geometric organizations and force simulations, while simultaneously considering the design opportunities being afforded by advances in computation and fabrication technologies. In this elective course, students will research and analyze the history of funicular form and its applications within architecture, explore the application and manipulation of both physical and digital form-finding experiments, performative analysis and simulation, and digital fabrication protocols to explore the potential for materiality and non-standardization processes to augment performance through variable organizations. The goal of the course is to understand performance as a design catalyst for the exploration of form. Students must have proficiency in Rhino 3D and a minimum proficiency with Grasshopper. All other software will be introduced in the course. Students will need to have the following softwares installed: • Rhino 3D • Grasshopper plug-in for Rhino • Kangaroo plug-in for Grasshopper • Karamba plug-in for Grasshopper
 
500aL
Comprehensive Architectural Design
Comprehensive Architectural Design
Prerequisite(s): 402abL Corequisite(s): ARCH 501 Note: Substitution for previously required ARCH 402cL Selected areas of specialization; projects chosen from a variety of studio offerings, all with an emphasis on the comprehensive design of buildings.
 
501
Comprehensive Studio Support and Enrichment
Comprehensive Studio Support and Enrichment
The aim for the seminar is to gain a critical, theoretical, and technical understanding of the various methodologies that students will be asked to explore in the studio. Further, we will also explore the relationship between technological and cultural shifts in contemporary society. Students will work in pairs to present and lead discussions of each week’s readings in the first half of the semester. The second half will comprise of individual crits and each student will submit a 3-5000 word research paper at the end of the semester.
 
502aL
Architectural Design V
Architectural Design V

Pre-requisites: ARCH-500A and ARCH-501.


The final comprehensive architectural project under the guidance of a faculty adviser to demonstrate architectural knowledge, skills, and professional interests and goals.

 
505aL
Graduate Architecture Design I - Principles
Graduate Architecture Design I - Principles
A general introduction to architectural principles, intended to develop design and critical thinking skills and proficiency to communicate those ideas effectively. Open to graduate architecture majors only.
 
505bL
Graduate Architecture Design I - Site
Graduate Architecture Design I - Site
Introduction to building systems and site design principles. Open to graduate architecture majors only.
 
507
Theories of Computer Technology
Theories of Computer Technology
Building information modeling (BIM) is one of the hottest topics in the architecture / engineering / construction profession (AEC) today. Learn what it is (3d parametric modeling), common software tools (this class concentrates primarily on Revit Architecture and some Navisworks), how it relates to sustainable design issues (Vasari and Green Building Studio), and why it is useful to the AEC industry (including being able to create awesome adaptive components!). Although offered in the School of Architecture, the techniques taught are equally applicable to others with an interest in the applications of BIM. Building science majors, structural engineering students, construction management students, and others are strongly encouraged to enroll. It is assumed that students already have a basic understanding of 2D CAD and 3D digital modeling.
 
511L
Seminar Building Systems
Seminar Building Systems
Develop an understanding of building materials and assemblies and their characteristics, impacts, and performance. Topics covered include building envelope performance and aesthetics, environmental systems (heating, cooling, daylighting, and acoustics), and basic principles of construction. Students will also develop an understanding of the financial implications of building components and systems.
 
512
Material + Process Material Systems
Material + Process Material Systems

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 211 or 511L This design research seminar examines both disciplinary and extra-disciplinary technologies, techniques, and theories for the use of Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composite material systems in the design and construction of architecture.


Students will gain a basic understanding of the engineering principles behind these material systems and establish a background in the architectural applications for FRP, both historic and contemporary. Students will also study FRP composites through selected extra-disciplinary precedents, such as racing sailboats, contemporary aircraft, and wind turbines.


Students will examine the advantages and disadvantages of FRP composite systems, critically considering how FRP materials perform in relation to conventional building systems, technically and aesthetically. Students will explore performance-based FRP design by reimagining existing precedents as new architectural building systems.


Students will be required to consider formal surface geometries, spatial opportunities, structure, life-safety, fabrication, transport, and assembly as some of the factors impacting architectural performance. Students will create a research-based design project, including original writing, drawings, diagrams, and models, speculating about the possibilities for use of FRP composite building systems in contemporary architectural design.

 
513L
Seminar Advanced Structures
Seminar Advanced Structures

This seminar emphasizes the study of horizontal structures, with a focus on the integration of building systems and exploring the fit and synergy of form and structure. Develop informed intuition for structures, their response to natural forces (gravity, seismic, thermal, wind), and how structure interacts with other design issues. Identify strategies and explore issues and problems in the development of building structure systems such as design criteria, system selection, design development, optimization, and system integration. Seismic design and seismic failure will also be introduced. Learn the basics of Multiframe and LDG (Lateral Design Graph) to design for lateral wind and seismic load.


Required text:

Structure and Design: https://titles.cognella.com/structure-and-design.html/


Detailed information is posted at http://www.usc.edu/structures/

 
514A
Global History of Architecture I
Global History of Architecture I

A historical survey of global architecture, analyzed as a product of social, cultural, religious and political forces: 4500 BCE to 1500 CE.

 
514B
Global History of Architecture II
Global History of Architecture II

A historical survey of global architecture, analyzed as a product of social, cultural, religious and political forces.a: 4500 BCE to 1500 CE; b: 1500 CE to present.

 
515L
Seminar Advanced Environmental Systems
Seminar Advanced Environmental Systems
The course is intended to give the students both a fundamental and practical knowledge of building environmental control systems and strategies in thermal, air quality, lighting, and acoustic conditions in large and small buildings. It also provides a working knowledge of many of the interrelated building systems necessary to support human physiological benefits: environmental comfort and health effects. Much of the material covered in this course will help to prepare the student in direct way for the professional building environmental design.
 
518
Advanced Surface Tectonics; Methods in Material and Enclosure
Advanced Surface Tectonics; Methods in Material and Enclosure
The building envelope mediates internal and external conditions for improved human comfort, energy performance, sustainability, aesthetics and more. Innovations in the design, delivery and operation of the facade are being driven by technology, computing, materiality and method. The course includes lectures by global leaders on subjects such structural glass facades, double-skin facades, fabric skins, parametric envelopes, facade science, and others.
 
519
Sustainability in the Environment: Infrastructures, Urban Landscapes, and Buildings
Sustainability in the Environment: Infrastructures, Urban Landscapes, and Buildings
Working with established and emerging environmental management frameworks, this course aims to explore and apply practical (and measurable) approaches to address urban sustainability challenges at the street, neighborhood, district, and municipal scale with a focus on regions within the greater Los Angeles area as laboratories for investigation. The course generates an overall picture of L.A.'s metabolism to map and analyze resource flows and to examine the city’s ecological footprint. It evaluates where and how resources are used and where action might be taken to transform existing infrastructures, landscapes and buildings to meet sustainability performance goals established by the city of Los Angeles, the State of CA, and the class.
 
520
Housing and Community Design for an Aging Population
Housing and Community Design for an Aging Population
Since 1950, the number of people over 65 has tripled and in the next 30 years, the over 65 population will grow 220%. This multi-disciplinary course focuses on the design of housing and community settings for older people, introducing students to a range of building types built to serve those recently retired as well as those who need health and caregiving support to stay independent. It examines the building type through context and case studies from northern Europe, Japan and the US. This course arms students with the knowledge and insight necessary to create environments that enhance the quality of life for older people. Three local site visits enable students to experience exemplar models and learn directly from discussions with older residents and administrative personnel.
 
523aL
Structural Design and Analysis
Structural Design and Analysis
Introduction to behavior and analysis of building structures. Structural loading, materials, and element types will be explored to understand the basic building blocks of buildings.
 
523bL
Structural Design and Analysis
Structural Design and Analysis
Investigation and design of building structural systems for gravity, wind and seismic loading. Comprehensive design exploration of framing type, materials, detailing, layout, form and integration.
 
525
Professional Practice Pre-Design, Project and Office Administration
Professional Practice Pre-Design, Project and Office Administration

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 302bL


Design methodology, typology programming, site analysis, budget formulation and pro-forma procedures. Office management, emphasizing professional service and professional ethics as well as project management focusing on the architect’s responsibilities during construction.

 
526
Professional Practice Legal & Economic Context, Project Documentation
Professional Practice Legal & Economic Context, Project Documentation
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 302bL The laws and regulations that affect the practice of architecture and building economics and the development of comprehensive project documentation, detailing, specifications, drawing formats and organiza­tions.
 
527
Case Studies The Development of Urban Housing
Case Studies The Development of Urban Housing
If you are considering becoming a developer of housing after you graduate, this course will provide you with an introductory overview of the issues and challenges developers face in providing small-scale housing in an urban setting. Designed primarily for upper-division undergraduates, this seminar will explore the various elements and stages of the housing development process for projects in Southern California. Students will learn about and prepare each component, including land, entitlements, program, design brief, support spaces, site plan, hard and soft costs and a cost analysis/proforma suitable for presentation to banks, investors and lending institutions. The course will include guest lecturers who are practicing professionals in the Los Angeles housing development arena and who will present a series of local case studies. There will be ample opportunities for open discussion. Guest lecturers include non-profit and for-profit developers, architects, construction managers, entitlement consultants, cost & estimating specialists, lenders and investors, contractors, and property managers. Lectures will also include architectural design, quality, sustainable design, and the related cost issues. * For Spring 2018, this course will meet the first half of the semester and will include 2 required Saturday Field Trips, February 10 & 17.
 
528
Urban Housing Types and Typologies
Urban Housing Types and Typologies
The course explores themes chosen from well over half a century of architectural interests, concerns and obsessions from Modern to present Post-Vanguard dwelling in and around a multi-centralized Los Angeles. Lectures cover debates over style, technology, materials, scale, and building codes among others. These topics are placed within the context of first hand sources and site visits -- the technologies of their representation and construction in order to locate specific typological shifts in the development of these urban dwelling(s). Students will conduct a series of short investigations, shared with the class via visual, diagrammatic, and textual analysis. Each student will select one of these projects for extended research and development, which will be included in a class book produced at the end of the term. Discussions and readings reference the single family house -- John Entenza’s Case Study house competition for Arts & Architecture magazine, Reyner Banham’s LA, the works of Ain, Koenig, Lautner, Neutra, Schindler and Wright and segue into contemporary Perimeter block and infill, High-rise slabs and towers, Low-rise clusters, rows, courtyards, the Dingbat, Michael Webb’s Building Community, and the multi-family (striving for below market) works of Daly, Koenig Eizenberg, Maltzan, O’Herlihy, and Tighe.
 
529
Urban Housing Precedents & Recent Case Studies
Urban Housing Precedents & Recent Case Studies
The class will provide a historical overview of the major housing developments and innovations since the early 20th century, using a case-study format examining a wide range of issues that determine the form of urban housing in various conditions. Major emphasis will be placed on a detailed analysis of social, technical, and design factors affecting recent housing developments. This course will provide participants with a general understanding of the production of housing as a commodity and a building block of communities in the context of the geography of urban systems. It will focus on housing development in general and multi-unit housing development in particular. The course will use case studies to help illustrate concepts supported by in-class lab assignments that will reinforce the concepts discussed during the lectures. Participants will become familiar with the tools and the language of real-estate finance and market research. By the end of the course, students will be able to conduct feasibility analyses of potential real-estate projects that measure both the economic and social benefits of the project. Students will understand the regulatory environment as well as the economic imperatives related to housing, primarily from the perspective of architecture and planning, but will also consider inputs from sociology, economics, and development finance. Students will learn how housing is produced and how issues of race or ethnicity, family status, geography, and other characteristics affect the provision of housing in urban America.
 
530
Landscape Architecture Practice
Landscape Architecture Practice
The purpose of this course is an introduction to the practice of Landscape Architecture. Topics include the expansive knowledge necessary to engage in all levels of practice from entry level designer to sole proprietor of a small business. Regardless of the size and type of practice landscape designers and architects need a working command of the principles of successful practice. Students will learn basic principles of practice organization, management, ethics and culture. Topics include history of the profession, practice management, project management, risk management, business and practice ethics, licensure, marketing and the laws and guidelines that guide landscape architecture. Guest lecturers and field trips will illustrate the importance of collaborative relationships between landscape architecture and the allied professions of architecture, urban design, civil engineering and planning. Students will develop tools to think critically about their goals for practice type and structure.
 
531
The Natural Landscape
The Natural Landscape
Landscape Architecture is rightly focused on design. Students explore how, through design interventions, places can be made that “work,” often from an experiential, aesthetic, or social perspective. As landscape architects become leaders in sustainability and in the field of ecological restoration, there is recognition that designed places must also work as a component of the natural landscape and projects are called upon to perform ecosystem functions. The purpose of this course is to provide the necessary scientific background on the patterns, processes, and performance of the natural landscape — defined as the surface of the Earth with minimal human intervention — to inform design options ranging from plant choice to patch size to corridor configuration.
 
534
Landscape Construction Topographic Design
Landscape Construction Topographic Design
Several of the most fundamental and ubiquitous of all the design skills the landscape architect must master are site grading, drainage design, and the onsite management of stormwater. Landscape Intervention: Construction Methods teaches basic grading, design of drainage systems, and stormwater management, along with some basic construction topics. This diverse course also covers cut and fill calculations, soil compaction, concrete construction joint placement, site survey, model making, contour maps, watershed area definition, and basic road design.
 
535
Landscape Construction Performance Approaches
Landscape Construction Performance Approaches
Develop tools and knowledge to expand the performative boundaries of landscape architecture beyond common typologies. Topics range from ecological infrastructure to design with weather patterns. A systematic approach to case studies, landscape technologies, and field trips seeds the knowledge base and representational methods necessary to design and build these complex landscape performances.
 
536
The Landscape Planning Process
The Landscape Planning Process
Students will develop an enhanced understanding of where landscape architecture (design) plays an imperative role in reconciling natural, social, cultural, political, and economic conflicts in cities; and where -- importantly -- it plays no role whatsoever. Certain methods (i.e., GIS) will be identified as a critical technical tool. Methods of assessing urban places regarding natural, social, cultural and political factors; identification of landscape architec­ture planning and project implementation issues and strategies.
 
537L
Urban Plant Ecology Environmental Perspectives
Urban Plant Ecology Environmental Perspectives
Architecture 537 involves (1) the review of information found in plant physiology, and ecological principles and concepts of sustainability found in natural systems, (2) the study of native and introduced plant species and plant associations of Southern California and (3) calculations and data used to estimate water and energy use associated with urban landscapes. The primary purpose of this course is to develop a foundation for the design of urban landscapes that provide greater benefits and achieve higher levels of sustainability than current landscapes. Learning will be achieved through lectures, discussions, campus planting identification walks and field trips. Lectures will incorporate a series of weekly exercises and readings.
 
538L
Urban Plant Ecology- Cultural Perspectives
Urban Plant Ecology- Cultural Perspectives
Landscapes are living systems that can contribute to the health and success of urban environments. Learn to apply concepts of plant ecology and plant physiology to landscapes throughout Southern California. Discussions, site visits, and on-campus planting studies will expose students to the cultural, aesthetic, and functional roles of landscapes. Students will prepare sustainable planting concepts for urban landscapes.
 
539
Media for Landscape Architecture
Media for Landscape Architecture
This course is an introduction to design graphics for landscape architecture and is based on the simple belief that drawing is the primary medium of expression in the communication of design ideas. Students will learn to use drawings as an active tool to critically explore, evaluate, and express design ideas. This course specifically stresses the instrumentality of 2D drawing systems for communicating and thinking graphically and as a foundation for creative action. Students will employ both hand and digital drawing methods.
 
540
Topics in Media for Landscape Architecture
Topics in Media for Landscape Architecture
Learn how landscape architecture design can be augmented by programming custom computational tools and processes. Explore how algorithmic tools, rapidly constructed in the Grasshopper / Rhino visual programming language, enable the development of designs with feedback from complex site systems and processes. Students will learn how to integrate custom landscape design, analysis, and representation tools into iterative processes that help coordinate design function and form. No prior knowledge of Grasshopper is required, though students should have familiarity with Rhino modeling and rendering. Students may also engage in some rapid landscape prototyping with the laser cutter, CNC mill, and 3D printers.
 
541aL
Landscape Architecture Design
Landscape Architecture Design
The first of the MLA 3’s core design studios, this course introduces the fundamental concepts, principles and elements of landscape architectural design. Students conduct a variety of exercises that develop and coordinate a theory and practice of landscape architecture design, representation, and site engagement. Studio begins with basic formal design exercises that transition into local site engagements. Expertise and skill are cultivated through a series of drawing techniques and prescribed exercises that develop a fundamental idea of site dialogue – a dialectic – between our interventions, bodies, and the existing condition. Students will learn and practice digital and analog drawing and modeling techniques.
 
541bL
Landscape Architecture Design
Landscape Architecture Design
As the density of modern cities compresses more and more on the public open spaces so integral to the well-being of their populations, the role of the landscape architect becomes increasingly vital to the development of viable schemes to maximize and enhance the parks and plazas that constitute the public realm. Additionally, it is arguably within the role of these designers to integrate, within their proposals, elements that will serve as markers or talismans of the history of the sites which, in the 21st century world, are being so rapidly redeveloped that the sense of the past is often irrevocably lost. This semester’s work will focus on the both the weaving of park and plaza space into the urban fabric, and the relevance of history, both local and typological, into these projects.
 
542aL
Landscape Architecture Design
Landscape Architecture Design
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 541bL The studio will be focused on building topographic form based on fractal geometries that promote environmental, programmatic, and aesthetic performances. The contingencies of doing this within an urban built environment will be explored. After studying the Owen’s Valley (which is essentially a large portion of LA’s effective watershed) at large and small scales for the first half of the semester a site in Los Angeles will be become the focus for a final design. The studio will be split into two geographic and conceptual parts, emphasizing the multi-scalar nature of landscapes in both form and function:
 
542bL
Landscape Architecture Design
Landscape Architecture Design
Projects for the public realm with emphasis on urbanity and connectivity, place and meaning.
 
544
Urban Landscape Process and Place
Urban Landscape Process and Place
This course examines the processes of building the urban landscape as products of man and nature. Cities evolve as cumulative layers and projects applied under theoretical constructs in the context of economic, social, ecological and natural forces. Arch 544 examines the growth of Cities including Los Angeles. Readings and projects will focus on Urban evolution from migratory settlements dependent upon natural systems to a new forms of globally connected Urbis with complex communications, political, transportation, housing, infrastructure and technology systems. Students explore the past and present to better understand and speculate about the future.
 
545
Urban Landscape Contemporary History and Prospect
Urban Landscape Contemporary History and Prospect
Landscape Architecture as a contemporary practice has its theoretical roots in multiple disciplines, drawing from geography, ecology, architecture, sociology and art. In the 20th century, the study of ‘landscape’ came to encompass not only designed landscapes created by architects or landscape architects but also the cultural landscapes of infrastructure, agriculture or industry. This breadth of cultural production and the lack of shared theoretical foundations can be at once freeing and destabilizing and requires working carefully and contextually. First, this course is an introduction to the writings and writers that comprise the core of what is understood to be landscape architectural theory. Second, this course focuses on the methodologies that makes text and reflective writing applicable to the work of design. In short, we will better understand how ideas make their way into the practice of landscape architecture and, in turn, inform the way we write and think about landscapes. The lectures of this class will be punctuated by guest practitioners who will discuss this cycle of reading, translation, design, reflection and writing.
 
546
Topics in Landscape Architecture Issues and Practices
Topics in Landscape Architecture Issues and Practices
Analysis and solutions conceptualization for a wide range of topics of public health related to land use and open space. Topics will include: air pollution, water pollution, soil pollution, lack of open space, nature deficits, isolation and monotony, temperature rise, gun violence, drought and childhood diseases. The class will meet with public health faculty and researchers at the USC Keck School of Medicine, and make site visits to better understand the sites where health risks are in conflict with current and future land uses. Students will apply their research to selected sites analyzing issues of equity, disease and long term health costs and then develop conceptual guidelines to inform future policy development and site design. ARCH-546 may be repeated for a maximum of 6 units when topic is different.
 
547
Urban Nature
Urban Nature
Nature is frequently thought to be found only “out there” beyond the city. However, “in here” conservation of many species requires protection of their habitats in urban areas, as does maintenance of the quality of life in cities. This course explores the many issues that arise from the recognition that cities too have natural values that can be protected, restored, or even created. The course is divided into three parts. First is an introduction to the ecology of cities and our knowledge about the factors that affect the distribution and persistence of plants and animals in urban landscapes and the role they play in human experience. Second is an exploration of the major threats to urban biodiversity and their interaction with human attitudes and practices. Third is the review of controversies and successes of urban nature education, restoration, and conservation projects in the Los Angeles basin, with a concentration on design at local to regional scales. This course will be offered every other Spring semester (2019).
 
548
Media for Landscape Architecture 3D Design
Media for Landscape Architecture 3D Design
The landscape surface is richly complicated with notions of process, transformation, texture, and pattern. Abstract smoothness is a fleeting moment in the landscape project. Once a surface becomes exposed to the parameters of inhabitation, vegetation, and environment, roughness overtakes. This course will explore the generation of form as it relates to the surfaces and processes of landscape. Moving between prescriptive and plastic methodologies, intuition and logic, students will develop a series of three-dimensional analogous terrains. Through these studies we will explore the representational boundaries and techniques of physical and digital space.
 
549
Fundamentals of Heritage Conservation
Fundamentals of Heritage Conservation
Heritage conservation (a/k/a historic preservation) is a multi-disciplinary and far-reaching field that has evolved steadily and dramatically over the decades. Explore a range of subjects and issues that affect contemporary heritage conservation practice, including its historical and philosophical underpinnings, the role of government and individuals in identifying and protecting historic resources, and the field’s political, legal, economic, social, cultural and technical dimensions.
 
550
Heritage Conservation Policy and Planning
Heritage Conservation Policy and Planning
Recommended preparation: ARCH 549 No matter your exact title, institution, training and special skills, whether architect, planner, or elected official, you will act in some capacity as manager, planner, and policy maker for historic sites and buildings. As a conservation professional, you will be expected to have a basic understanding of scholarly research; interpretation; design and aesthetics; materials conservation; public policy and land use law; real estate; and community planning. As such, this course will serve as an overview of the aspects of heritage conservation related to policy and planning.
 
551
Conservation Methods and Materials
Conservation Methods and Materials
Recommended preparation: ARCH 549 The physical fabric of historic structures is a tangible record connecting us directly to the people and events that shaped both our past and the future. Materials conservation requires a basic knowledge of material properties and behavior and involves many techniques, from research and building forensics to testing and implementation. This course will examine the characteristics and treatments for the most commonly used building materials and the application of heritage conservation criteria. Students will play an integral role in the materials analysis of a historic property.
 
552
Introduction to Historic Site Documentation
Introduction to Historic Site Documentation
Explore new ways of observing and thinking about the built environment through practical applications of documentation methods and fieldwork exercises. Learn the various techniques employed in the field of heritage conservation for recording and documenting historic resources, including methods of architectural classification such as historic resources surveys; National Register, California Register, and local registration standards; photographic documentation; historic structure reports and cultural landscape reports; and HABS/HAER documentation.
 
553
History of American Architecture and Urbanism
History of American Architecture and Urbanism
Architecture 553 examines the impact of politics, culture and the environment on the evolution of American architectural and urban forms from prehistory to World War II. The class explores the interchange between European architectural theory and indigenous and vernacular influences as they came together to create new national and regional forms of building and urban design. While generally chronological in presentation, lectures also examine a series of case studies in order to more closely explore the complexity of form and meaning in the American landscape.
 
554
Heritage Conservation Practicum Practical Archaeology
Heritage Conservation Practicum Practical Archaeology
Professional heritage conservationists, architects, architectural historians, and planners deal with managing cultural resources every day, yet very few of us have a working knowledge of the archaeological resources lying beneath our feet. The all-too-common result is the unwitting dismissal of, and often the outright destruction of, irreplaceable cultural resources. This course provides an introduction to the field of archaeology as it is currently practiced in the U.S., with a particular emphasis on helping non-archaeologists become better stewards of our collective heritage. It will present a brief overview of North American prehistory and history; survey past and present archaeological theory, methods, and research goals; and investigate how the discipline is situated within the larger field of heritage conservation. Our exploration of archaeological fundamentals, from legal contexts to artifact description, will culminate in the field documentation of a surface archaeological site; this weekend field trip is a required element of the course.
 
554 - Stewardship
Heritage Conservation Practicum - Historic Site Management
Heritage Conservation Practicum - Historic Site Management
Why do some historic house museums thrive while others struggle from one crisis to the next? With nearly five decades of successful operation, the Gamble House in Pasadena will serve as the paradigm for understanding practical strategies to identify, develop and manage viable historic sites. If you anticipate a career in historic site management or a related field you will need to be familiar with developing a mission statement, interpretative programming, conservation issues, visitor infrastructure, funding strategies, volunteers, membership, public relations, budgeting, retail sales, collections management, and other important operational concerns. Course sessions will take place at the Gamble House in Pasadena, in addition to selected historic houses nearby.
 
554 - Survey
Heritage Conservation Practicum Survey
Heritage Conservation Practicum Survey
Assessing historic buildings, sites, neighborhoods, and landscapes within their historic contexts forms the foundation of contemporary heritage conservation practice. Through lectures and fieldwork, this course will examine the tools required for assessment including research, writing historic contexts, understanding the vocabulary of the region’s architecture, assessing architectural character and integrity, utilizing state-of-the-art data collection techniques, basic architectural photography, and other best practices. As a non-design based studio course, students will be responsible for research and fieldwork to craft a cohesive survey evaluation of the area of study selected for each semester, in addition to a community presentation of their findings.
 
555
Global Perspectives in Heritage Conservation
Global Perspectives in Heritage Conservation
The definitions, efforts and efficacies of heritage conservation are inherent to and shaped by the social, political and economic cultures of a place. In many societies outside the Western world, the strategies that underlie the success of heritage conservation efforts are therefore significantly different than those typically pursued in Europe and the United States. Extreme economic disparities, ethnic and religious diversity and ad hoc, illegal possession and appropriation of historic sites surface the need for bottom-up instead of top-down strategies, self-help mechanisms and populist grassroots efforts as methods and tools. Additionally, the multi-generational presence of unconventional habitat types such as squatters, slums, urban villages and refugee camps, also raise complex questions on what constitutes heritage and how and why we need to conserve them. The course will introduce students to the issues and challenges surrounding the idea of heritage conservation beyond the Euro-American world. It will specifically aim at provoking discussions on the nexus of heritage conservation, socio-economic inclusiveness and social justice by focusing on selected case studies that highlight the dilemmas of these other worlds.
 
556
Readings in Heritage Conservation Theory
Readings in Heritage Conservation Theory
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 549 Not everyone views the historic built environment through the same lens. Heritage conservation is inherently multi-disciplinary and strategies and implementation can vary widely in various regions across the United States and around the world. In order to have a more complete intellectual grounding in the field, students will read and critically discuss seminal works related to urban planning, architecture, history (local, public, cultural, architectural, etc.), landscape, archeology, history, law, public policy, cultural studies, and American studies.
 
557
Sustainable Conservation of the Historic Built Environment
Sustainable Conservation of the Historic Built Environment
Explore the intersection between the heritage conservation and green building movements, both of which contribute to sustainable development. Heritage conservation promotes the ethos of stewardship; defining what is significant about the built environment; methods of extending the service-life of buildings; the value of maintenance and repair; and effective means for adaptively re-using buildings. Green building promotes holistic design; responds to the urgency of climate change and the need to reduce greenhouse gases; and encourages us to look at new systems and technology. By exploring the a variety of approaches to conserving the built and natural environments, students will be able to identify and differentiate between methods for assessing sustainability, develop appropriate metrics, apply evaluation tools, and determine appropriate treatments to improve projects.
 
558
Fundamentals of Place-Making
Fundamentals of Place-Making
* Registration is restricted to Master of Heritage Conservation students or those without previous Architectural Design background* This course is aimed to expose graduate students in the Heritage Conservation discipline to the foundational ideas and basic skills of urban design and place-making. Specifically this course will overview some of the most dominant theories of urban design as well as their immersive relationship with various graphic means of representing a designed landscape and/or place. Using the USC campus as study area, this course will teach students to read the built environment as a physical setting of identifiable elements each having specific dimensions and characteristics, and their combination into complex larger wholes. Finally, this course will engage students in design exercises involving strategic thinking on what to preserve, what to change and what to introduce new and why. The specific goals of this course are as follows: Create awareness on various contemporary positions and lenses for reading the built environment. Develop a basic understanding of the physical components of the urban landscape and their dimensional characteristics – from the scale of the region to that of a street. Develop a basic understanding of how to represent in two and three-dimensions, the basic physical components of an urban landscape – from trees to building typologies – and how to depict them. Engage in basic place-making exercises that analyze conditions towards proposing transformation and change.
 
560
A History of Architectural Theory 1400-1914
A History of Architectural Theory 1400-1914
Course Description: A seminar on architectural theory from Alberti to Scott, reviewing primary texts and subsequent criticisms. This seminar explores theories of architecture since the beginning of the Renaissance. It involves both reading original texts (where available in translation) and study of the contexts in which the theories were produced. We will also consider some of the buildings which influenced or were influenced by the theories. There are therefore two components to the analysis of the texts: theory and context. Seminal writings on architecture in western Europe, these texts certainly do not exhaust the thoughtful theoretical writings of many others, and there are essays from other cultures and in the United States during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, but they will not be considered in this course. What were the questions architects and theorists asked of architecture in the early modern era? What was important, and why? What were the assumptions they made about architecture, and about architects, and how did this color the types of questions they asked and the theories they devised? Course Objectives: In the most general terms, this course is an introduction to architectural theory from the 15th through the 19th centuries. Students should gain a working knowledge of developments in architectural theory in Western Europe during this period. The course has other objectives as well. Students will work on developing the ability to write a critical synthesis of a specific set of architectural theories, and be especially concerned that students learn to make cogent oral presentations.
 
561
Urbanism Themes and Case Studies
Urbanism Themes and Case Studies
Trace the history of ideas about the city - from antiquity to the present - through the cities which produced them. The course will take twelve cities as case studies and study their transformation and modernization through weekly lectures paired with selected readings from urban theory which emerged alongside their growth and change. The texts illuminate the varied and ongoing struggles all cities continue to wrestle with under pressures of rapid population growth, new technologies, and the need to become ecologically sustainable. The course articulates nuance and difference in place and culture; hoping to suspend -- for the duration of the course anyway -- the theory by some commentators that cities have become interchangeable: lost in the generic and ubiquitous nature of globalization, sprawl, and commercial capitalism.
 
562
Architecture Themes and Case Studies Constructing the Modern City
Architecture Themes and Case Studies Constructing the Modern City
Arch 562 will concentrate on architecture as it relates to urban form, urban space, and urban landscape. Students will investigate the relationship of buildings to our built environment, whether cities, suburbs, or constructed landscapes. The focus will primarily be on the modern city and the varying roles architecture has played in confronting, shaping, or even celebrating the effects of industrialization, post-­‐industrialization, and globalization.
 
563
Contemporary Architectural Theory
Contemporary Architectural Theory
Theory can be used as justification, as propaganda, as a guide for practice, as a set of principles, as a vehicle of thought, as a platform for debate, and as an architectural project in itself. This course considers the changing role of theory with respect to architectural, urban, and landscape practice over the course of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and aims to furnish students with a set of questions, techniques, and tools for criticism and self-critique. Focusing on key figures, movements, and texts, this course provides an overview of the principal theories that have informed, animated, or destabilized recent architectural, urban, and landscape discourse.
 
564
Descriptive and Computational Architectural Geometry
Descriptive and Computational Architectural Geometry
Geometry lies at the core of the architectural design process. It is omnipresent, from the initial form-finding stages to the actual construction. While design and geometry share a fundamental interest in form and shape, Descriptive and Computational Architectural Geometry aims to address the various natures of the historical relationship between mathematics, geometry, computation, and architecture. Through the display of historical mathematical models with formal affinities to contemporary architectural production, the course will provoke discussion about the relevance of a history of form, the origins of design technique, the epistemology of geometry models, and the justification for mathematical surfaces in architecture. This course examines the history, theory and practice of parallel (orthographic) and central (perspective) projection. The primary objective is to provide designers with the tools to imagine and represent with precision, dexterity, and virtuosity a continually expanding repertoire of three-dimensional architectural form.
 
565
Global History of Landscape Architecture
Global History of Landscape Architecture
This global history of the built environment will focus on how the constructed landscape has informed the shape of the city as an embodiment of public life and public values. We will consider landscape as design laboratory, as infrastructure, as theater (etc). The course will introduce the evolution of urban landscape theory and form, particularly as situated in historical, geographical and cultural context. Readings consist of primary sources, as well as subsequent social, politico-economic and cultural histories that reveal: (1) shifting receptions and interpretations of our urban inheritance; and (2) our evolving cultural and professional values. Cultural attitudes toward Nature will be an integral thematic concern, particularly as Nature is situated in ideological and physical relationship to the city.
 
566
Cross-Cultural Topics in Landscape Architecture History (Bharne)
Cross-Cultural Topics in Landscape Architecture History (Bharne)
The physical and ecological construct of urban landscapes across the world consists of a finite and identifiable series of elements – streets, buildings, rivers, infrastructure etc. However, the specific form, intent, intervention with, sustenance of, and inherent attitudes towards these elements, is shaped by several deeper phenomenological forces and circumstances that create distinct identities and signatures of people, place and culture. Different histories, growth patterns, governance structures, cultural beliefs and aspirations all ultimately create different expectations of what the urban landscape is and can be. This recognition has serious implications to the practice of landscape architecture and urbanism. How do we gauge the appropriateness of our interventions in a specific culture? How do we negotiate between our personal biases on what a place ought to be, versus reading it for what it is? How do we understand the practice of landscape design beyond passive physical amelioration, as a reflective engagement with cultural expectations, towards deeper change? The course examines of the contemporary urban landscape as an enmeshed duality of parallel culture-specific “urbanities” and “urbanisms”. “Urbanities” refers to the myriad phenomenological traits and processes of urban life and cultural experience – from polarizations of poverty and wealth, to the rapid urbanization of cities. “Urbanisms” in turn refers to the diverse physical products and characteristics of the urban landscape – from the psychedelic streetscapes of Tokyo, to the slums of Dacca. Moving across urban history in time and space, this course offers comparative perspectives on attitudes to the city and nature across various places and cultures. Where do they overlap? Where do they separate? How do their cross-influence one another?
 
566
Cross-Cultural Topics in Landscape Architecture History (Tichenor)
Cross-Cultural Topics in Landscape Architecture History (Tichenor)
Authenticity and Artifice: A Study of the Invented Landscape of Southern California Southern California has a unique place in the history of landscape design and urbanism. The effects of rapid multi-cultural development, as expressed in both the built environment and the images promulgated in Art, Film and Literature, have, at each stage of the region’s short history, projected a model to the rest of the world of a landscape of seemingly limitless possibility, both hopeful and dystopian. Through an analysis of the successive stages of land planning, garden design, and plant introductions, along with a careful consideration of the diverse writings informed by the distinct landscape of the area, this course will critically assess the cultural arena from which these strong images emerge, and what role designers have played, successfully and unsuccessfully, in molding the built environment.
 
573
Seismic Design
Seismic Design
Develop informed intuition for structural lateral systems strategies and layout required for seismic design. Understand the characteristics of earthquakes and the systems that resist them. Integrate seismic design into the overall architectural design of buildings including the detailing requirements for structural and nonstructural components. (From 2012 Syllabus) "Earthquakes and how they influence building design will be the subject of this course. Students will learn about the earth science behind earthquakes and the fundamentals of the physics and behavior of structural systems designed to resist earthquake motions. System and material selection for seismic design considering the structure, façade, and nonstructural components will be explored to help the student make informed decisions about seismic design."
 
574
Parametric Design
Parametric Design
This design seminar aims to investigate the parametric relationship between geometry and architecture element, in this case the relationship between the geometry of atrium and architectural circulation. We will begin by using parametric tools to examine existing architecture examples, which contains atriums and complex circulation systems, with the intention of exploring tensions, functions, and the spatial effects between them. Through this analyzation, students will construct their own geometrical narratives to express the parametric formal relationships of the subject of their studies. Thereafter, these geometrical narratives will be translated into iterations of physical models. This class consists of lectures and workshops, and will utilized both digital and physical media.
 
575a
Systems The Thermal Environment
Systems The Thermal Environment
Learn to apply the fundamental scientific principles governing the thermal environment and human physiology to contemporary issues of environmentally responsive building design and resource efficiency. Students will explore the technologies and strategies to control the indoor environment as well as the basic analyses needed to inform design decision-making and examine project performance. The course will cover the laws of thermodynamics, heat transfer and solar geometry in the context of building design and operation, and occupant comfort - the building as an environmental filter, where environmentally responsive design strategies are used to minimize the size and operation of mechanical systems and demand for energy from renewable sources. Following these steps, energy efficient mechanical systems, controls, and renewable energy technologies will be covered as a supplement to these strategies.
 
575b
Systems Luminous and Auditory Phenomena in Architecture
Systems Luminous and Auditory Phenomena in Architecture
This course is the second in the building systems series and covers topics of lighting and acoustics. The fundamental scientific principles governing light and sound in the built environment will be examined in the context of human physiological, psychological and biological needs. It exposes students to technologies, materials and strategies for control of light and sound in buildings as well as the basic analyses needed to inform design decision-making and examine project performance. The course will continue the themes of resource efficiency and end-user comfort through the examination of emerging metrics for daylight sufficiency, visual and acoustic comfort.
 
576
Sustainable Design for Healthy Indoor Environments
Sustainable Design for Healthy Indoor Environments
This course will expose seniors and/or graduate students to a systematic evaluation process for performing and diagnosing indoor environmental quality relative to thermal, lighting, air quality, acoustic, and spatial conditions in buildings. Emphasis will be on fundamental approaches for developing integrated environmental design methods that are primary requirements for students in the fields of architecture, environmental design, and building science. This knowledge is basic to understanding the principles underlying human-architecture interaction. The course will focus on the building design process required to assure indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and the needs of building occupants to promote their environmental health, work productivity, psychological comfort, aesthetic quality, and satisfaction. Technical applications will involve user surveys, environmental data collection, and in-depth analysis, as well as suggested steps and processes for solving environmental problems. Course content is designed to help students develop a framework for addressing architectural design and research problems and for identifying practical solutions to the design planning process that will assure a successful building project.
 
577
Lighting Design
Lighting Design
The artist, the scientist and the architect who want to understand their world are fascinated by light. Light is the medium of perception in art and in architecture. Light is also one of the most fascinating aspects of physics. As far as we know, it is the only constant. Indeed time and space warps around the constant speed of light. Examine the perceptual and physical aspects of light and learn how the design profession has used light, the tools with which it studies light, and the design principles and drawing conventions with which the profession manipulates light in buildings.
 
579
Sustainable Building and Environment using LEED Metrics
Sustainable Building and Environment using LEED Metrics

This course will provide fundamental knowledge of sustainable building concepts, current environmental design building rating systems (for example, LEED), and building performance and diagnostic metrics, as well as referenced standards related to sustainable design.


The course will examine U.S. case studies to determine best practices, and will adopt practical research experiments in building indoor environmental quality, focusing on thermal, air, lighting, and acoustic qualities. It will also introduce technical and quantitative methods for passive design strategies for a zero energy building. This practice-based course will equip students with analytical skills to develop best green design and technology combinations depending on environmental characteristics of a building site.


Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the LEED Accredited Professionals / Green Associate Exam, which is rapidly becoming the standard of recognition for green building professionals.

 
580
Field Studies
Field Studies
One of the most important aspects of field research is the opportunity to gain insight into the relationships between design language, building proposition and construction process of specific periods/architects/buildings/landscapes. It is an occasion to discover not only the tenets upon which an designer bases his work, but also how these tenets resolve complex relationships between a project, its site and the cultural/theoretical context in which it was constructed. Through thoughtful case study analysis students will explore how these external forces influence/direct the form and shape of the designed response. This Field Studies course will concentrate on projects and practices [from the analysis of buildings to the focused engagement with the methods of practice], landscapes and ecologies [both natural and manmade], and urban spaces [including parks, plazas, and urban (re)development projects]. The field study of these spaces and methods also provides an opportunity to understand the complex relationship of the designer with place. These place-based investigations will engage field studies to employ analytical methods, representational techniques, and speculative inquiry into the fundamental spatial and infra-structural elements of place. This investigation allows one to develop awareness as well as appreciate the complex relationship between a place, its inhabitants and the spaces that facilitate a multitude of events and activities.
 
581
Techniques in Digital Fabrication
Techniques in Digital Fabrication
The arrival of two KUKA 6-axis robotic arms marked a new phase in USC’s fabrication and design curriculum. With the reliability, accuracy and flexibility afforded by these machines we hope to change the way students understand and engage digitally driven tools for fabrication. Students taking this course will be given primary access to our KR6 Agilus and KR120HA industrial robots. Building on the original digital fabrication seminar, students will become well versed in the language of robotics and kinematics, becoming the de facto programers and operators. Utilizing our core shop and fabrication facilities, students will be expected to design and build custom end-effectors and tooling for the robots. While the concept of programming may seem imposing, newly developed parametric plugins such as KukaPRC allow direct interface between Rhino/Grasshopper and the robot arms. This interface will be the primary focus of our design work in this seminar.
 
585
Visual Storytelling and Entrepreneurship in Media
Visual Storytelling and Entrepreneurship in Media
THIS COURSE IS 100% ONLINE. Designers are storytellers. Each line we draw or model we build expresses intent. Historically, drawing has been the primary medium of expression in the communication of design ideas. In this course we will combine traditional methods of expression with current online technology to create unique and compelling visual stories. Anyone can tell a story, but learning to tell an engaging, poignant story that generates real interest, enthusiasm, support and excitement is a vital tool in today’s fast-moving digital culture. This course helps the student understand how visual stories can serve as an active tool to critically explore, evaluate, and express design ideas. This course specifically stresses the instrumentality of online videos for communicating and thinking graphically. This master class in media making, distribution and promotion will benefit architecture and design students who want deeper and more practical uses for visual storytelling. In the first half of the course, the emphasis is on telling a visual story effectively. The second half is devoted to presentation and promotion, including crowdfunding. The emphasis throughout is always on the deep structure that is critical to creating an effective visual story. Instructor Background: Lee Schneider is creative director of Red Cup Agency, a communications agency based in Santa Monica and known for its work with startups, entrepreneurs and social activists. He is the founder of Digital Fundraising School, an online school that helps media-makers, designers and tech visionaries become better crowdfunders. He is the author of "Be More Popular: Culture-Building for Startups." He has guest-lectured and taught workshops and classes at USC, University of Minnesota College of Design, Architecture for Humanity, and Public Architecture. Before his work with Red Cup, he was executive producer and founder of DocuCinema, a media production company that made documentaries and series television for The History Channel, Discovery Health, The Learning Channel, ReelzChannel, Food Network and Bravo. Early in his career, Mr. Schneider was a writer for Good Morning America and a producer for Dateline NBC.
 
586
City Cine Visuality, Media and Urban Experience
City Cine Visuality, Media and Urban Experience
In this course each week, we will compare chosen media examples (photography, films, anime/magna, commercials, web content, etc.) with selected seminal readings in urban planning and social theory to tease out latent connection between visual media and urban life. Each week is be structured around a different theme – city symphonies, alienation, gender, globalism, immigration, poverty, surveillance, ecology, noir, etc. Students are expected to select readings that particularly interest them each week and come to class prepared to discuss the major ideas at hand, referencing the required texts and the media example.
 
588
Interactive Architecture Computing and the Physical World
Interactive Architecture Computing and the Physical World
This course is a seminar and workshop exploring physical interaction with computational media in real time. The widespread diffusion of sensing, computational, and communicative media into the physical realm presents an opportunity for exploring and constructing intelligent objects understood through dynamic and complex relationships of adaptation and improvisation to the environment, the site, and the human body. The course will chart and explore a range of approaches for integrating computation into the physical realm through a series of projects using physical computing prototyping tools. This course is focused on self-directed, project-based learning within and experimental and collaborative setting. Students will design and develop projects that use sensors and microcontrollers to translate sensory input to control electro-mechanical devices such as motors, servos, lighting or other hardware in real time. There are no prerequisites for the class. This is an interdisciplinary course and students from outside the School of Architecture are welcomed and encouraged to register
 
599
Drawing Instructions
Drawing Instructions

In this seminar students will familiarize themselves with the history and evolution of the practice of architecture in an effort to better understand the significance of instruction and instructability. Students will be expected to develop a technical understanding of disciplinary graphic and annotative standards as they relate to the production of architectural construction documents as well as an intellectual appreciation of extradisciplinary methods of instruction-based production as they related to the fields of conceptual art, music and computer science.


Lectures, readings and class-time conversations will together provide a foundation for understanding of the importance of instruction in the practice of architecture. Production-based assignments will be issued as an opportunity for students to demonstrate their technical and intellectual understanding of the subject matter.

 
599
Healthcare Design
Healthcare Design
This course focuses on the design of a diverse collection of hospital and community settings for healthcare. The course introduces students to a range of building types that vary from major trauma centers to small scale community outpatient facilities. It traces the evolution of healthcare settings from the Greek period to current times, including the newest emphasis on public health and lifestyle.This topic of healthcare design is huge in scale and magnitude. In fact, many firms who specialize in this area, have their own in-house training programs. This course is meant to provide an overview of this changing building type and how it impacts the practice of medicine (and architecture) today. The course starts with the history of the hospital as a building type from 500BC to the present day summarizing with a list of today’s challenges and tomorrow’s future trends. It describes powerful research findings that show how landscape designs can combat depression and promote relaxation. Building organizational strategies and programming approaches are reviewed as well as factors that affect appearance and functionality. It examines the patient room and new trends that embrace old ideas and introduce new ones. It demonstrates how and why families/friends have become more active participants in the healing process. It also shows how empirical analysis (often labeled evidence-based design) is affecting practice. Finally, it ends with a look at new technologies like imaging diagnostics and operating room procedures which are changing high-tech medicine.
 
599
Informed Form
Informed Form

This is a design research seminar that will explore the relevance of architectural form as a product of discovery by exploring the reciprocity between form (geometry), force (performance), matter (organization), and craft (fabrication). It investigates and extends the design research legacies of analogue form-finding in the works of Frei Otto, Antonio Gaudi, Heinz Isler, and Felix Candela by exploring digital and analogue techniques for discovering form through variable material and geometric organizations and force simulations, while simultaneously considering the design opportunities being afforded by advances in computation and fabrication technologies. In this elective course, students will research and analyze the history of funicular form and its applications within architecture, explore the application and manipulation of both physical and digital form-finding experiments, performative analysis and simulation, and digital fabrication protocols to explore the potential for materiality and non-standardization processes to augment performance through variable organizations. The goal of the course is to understand performance as a design catalyst for the exploration of form. Students must have proficiency in Rhino 3D and a minimum proficiency with Grasshopper. All other software will be introduced in the course.


Students will need to have the following softwares installed:

  • Rhino 3D
  • Grasshopper plug-in for Rhino
  • Kangaroo plug-in for Grasshopper
  • Karamba plug-in for Grasshopper
 
599
Realtime Computational Representation: Game Engines And Virtual Reality
Realtime Computational Representation: Game Engines And Virtual Reality

Computational systems have reached the speed of operations that allows simulating human perception in real-time. It is no longer necessary to wait for hours to obtain an accurate depiction of the interplay of light with materials or calculate the angle of a shadow. By exploring gaming technology, this class will invite students to re-consider architectural representation through the scope of a real-time medium, where the exploration of space can be performed at a simulated 1:1 scale. 


Real-time technologies, as advanced by game engines, are not only a medium for architectural visualization, but also a medium for simulation, where data can be superimposed over architectural geometry, enabling an augmented perception of a digital project. By learning how to visualize and how to simulate data over pre-existing geometry, the class intends to give new tools of inquiry for mapping and framing architectural information. 


This course will be structured as a technical introduction to real-time visualization and virtual reality, exploring the opportunities and challenges presented by the medium. The course will be taught using the game engine Unity and will make use of the USC VR sets to test students projects in virtual reality. 


The objectives of the course is to challenge traditional conceptions of space and representation, generating conceptual simulations that develop insight into architecture’s potential. 

 
599
Research + Design + Build
Research + Design + Build
The Research + Design + Build Seminar will generate and analyze context and precedents, identify specific clients as well as develop programing criteria, and propose implementation strategies for specific projects to support school Design + Build efforts. Related course offerings will address design and prototyping in a studio framework, followed by directed research efforts to implement of the projects identified. While not required for enrollment in the initial seminar offering, it is intended that some of the students participating in the R+D+B seminar will be able to participate in the subsequent class efforts and provide the potential for continuity in the Research + Design + Build experience. Since it is not practical to assume or require students to participate in all of the offerings, an emphasis will be placed on clear and complete documentation of the work of each segment of the courses offerings to ensure accessibility and continuity. Learning Objectives: This two unit Seminar / Lab course is being offered to study the precedents and operation of existing successful examples of design - build programs and generate programmatic criteria in collaboration with neighborhood users and constituents. The intention is to prepare for subsequent stages of design and implementation using our current course structure of design studios and special course offerings and directed research as required for project implementation. The course is structured around three components: Research – precedents from existing design – build programs at peer institutions will be studied and used to generate an administrative, economic and academic model for the project with particular focus on the needs of our community, the resources of the school and the larger university, and the potential of the program to realize a built demonstration of those intentions. Project Focus – through an analysis of existing neighborhood institutions and potential interventions, the identification of a specific project suitable for development involving local user groups will be established. Programming of the specific project will involve direct community input and will result in a project brief that can be used in the subsequent spring design studio phase to follow. Collaboration and support exploiting our relationship with the professional community will be used both to gain additional perspective on the requirements of the project and to recruit additional resources during the subsequent design and implementation phases. Prototyping and preliminary design proposals using physical modeling will be used to validate programmatic criteria consistent with the learning objectives of the R+D+B initiative. Students will identify and analyze existing programs and will be responsible to collaborate on the collection, documentation and analysis of the material and the potential application of these precedents to the local conditions and needs of the USC neighborhood. This will include consideration of funding opportunities potentially available to the neighborhood. The identification of “users and clients” for the project proposals will build on existing institutional relationship between USC and the neighborhood as well as explore new opportunities.
 
599
Seminar in Space Architecture
Seminar in Space Architecture
Outer Space. Exploration. Moon. Mars. Imagine, design, visualize and create concepts for habitats and vehicles in truly alien environments. See and appreciate what is happening in advanced technologies, from gene editing tools to rocket propulsion and planetary spacesuits. Architects are working with scientists and engineers, assisting in designing space exploration habitats, and helping NASA and the space industry to cope with extreme environment design challenges. Dream, dream big, dream mighty. Give your worldview a “spacetech” makeover. From structures on planet Earth in extreme environments like Antarctica and the Sahara to those dwellings on the Moon, Mars and beyond. Appreciate the vehicles and systems that help people cope and do productive science, erect structures and work in the final frontier. Outer Space, Moon, Mars, here we come….will a sunflower bloom on Mars? Learn about Human Space Exploration Create Concepts for Moon and Mars habitats Develop High Technology Aesthetics and Expand Vocabulary Critical ‘Out-of-the Box’ Approach to Space Design Present your work at an International Space Conference in LA ISDC May 24-27th, Los Angeles Sheraton Gateway Hotel, LAX Connect with NASA, space professionals, and local private space companies We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time. – T.S.Eliot
 
599
Urban Occupation
Urban Occupation
The history of architecture is defined by housing. The objective of this course is to investigate the circumstances that determine forms of urban occupation in various cultures, while identifying design’s critical agency in fostering human habitation and interaction. With an emphasis on global social housing solutions, this course provides a historical overview of the major domestic and international housing innovations since the early 20th Century and the forces that encouraged those mutations. A comparative case study format will be followed to examine a wide range of concepts and position students to analyze and discuss these critical issues. Precedents will be examined in an expanded context, using culture as a lens through which to evaluate emergent concepts surrounding new disruptive modes of occupation, including mass migration, new models of affordable housing, temporary shelter, and emergency relief. The course takes a morphological approach to the study of how these factors are altering the ways societies live in cities and respond to extenuating circumstances, using its physical forms to elucidate the various, often less visible, forces shaping urban shelter including policy, culture, identity, temporality, ecology, and socio-economic issues.
 
599
Video Games, New Media & Simulation
Video Games, New Media & Simulation
Video games are considered by many the most relevant medium of the 21st century, allowing players to deal with complex systems of inter-dependences and algorithms in an intuitive fashion. The ability to manipulate data is an asset that the gaming world has developed over the past 50 years combining ideas of computation with human intuition. Today, video games and simulation engines have been democratised allowing anyone to create a new immersive experience. In the seminar, students will play and study key historic software; Games that allow for design and reinforce ideas of systemic thinking, combinatorics and simulation. By reverse engineering the games, the seminar will present ideas and paradigms of programming as well as design strategies for the interdependence of resources. By understanding the premises and algorithms involved in them, students will develop an understanding of complex systems and object-oriented design strategies preparing them to engage the new mediums and paradigms of the 21st century.
 
605aL
Graduate Architecture Design II - Integration
Graduate Architecture Design II - Integration
Basic principles of structural (seismic/wind and gravity), HVAC, building envelope, access/egress, building service systems; and sustainable strategies are critical to the proper execution of performative goals. The integration of building systems will be delineated to demonstrate the tectonic viability a design solution.
 
605bL
Graduate Architecture Design- Comprehensive
Graduate Architecture Design- Comprehensive
Comprehensive project emphasizing the interaction between general principles and local sites, building technologies and total building design.
 
606
Advanced Architectural Theory
Advanced Architectural Theory
Within contemporary architectural design a significant shift in emphasis can be detected – a move away from an architecture based primarily on visual concerns towards an architecture justified by its performance. Structural, constructional, economic, environmental and other parameters – concerns that were once relegated to a secondary level – have now become primary, and are being embraced as positive inputs into the design process from the outset. Architecture – it would seem – is now preoccupied less with style and appearance, and increasingly with material processes and performance. It is as though a new architectural design sensibility has emerged. But how exactly might we theorize this new sensibility? The course tracks this new development from its origins in materialist philosophies to its implications within the field of design. It draws upon biomimetics and other aspects of scientific thinking, such as theories of emergence and swarm intelligence, that are informing recent developments in contemporary design thinking. It goes on to consider the role of computation in this development, from new scripting techniques to fabrication technologies, from the scale of individual components to entire cities, and from terrestrial concerns to new robotic technologies being envisaged by NASA for application on the Moon. The aim of the class is to provide a theoretical manifesto for a new way of approaching design that is sweeping through architecture and urbanism.
 
607
Advanced Computation
Advanced Computation

This course stems from the assumption that architects should not only be able to use various tools, but should have the ability to create new critical and experimental design tools that respond to specific design-questions. In this course, we will aim at the generation of design-question oriented customized digital workflows. These customized workflows will explore the potential of breaking down a design problem into several questions in order to approach architectural and urban research through a bottom-up method. This technique will allow us to experiment with converging varied inter-operational platforms in order to develop custom toolsets for each proposed design question. The process of workflow customization will amplify our ability to explore options and achieve depth and speed of analysis. In this course we will use Rhino/Grasshopper as meta-tools which enable the creation of other tools.  


However, the course is not about software itself, but about experimental design processes. Using a series of custom scripts, techniques and workflows, Rhino/Grasshopper will be used to create new interfaces that disappear and become part of the Rhino environment or even part of the physical world. External input devices (cameras and sensors) will be used to create new relationships with 3d modeling, data will become incorporated into new forms of tools, and representation will be explored as a way to design the behavior of the user. Technology will not be used as calculators, but as augmentations of the designer that alters their design process.


The point of the course is to develop computational design thinking in order to acquire a critical lens for the evaluation of digital tools. Through a closer look at the relationship between computational design theories and methods, we will engage in an experimental feedback loop where new ideas can generate new design techniques, and new design techniques can thus generate new ideas.

 
607
Advanced Computation (Fall)
Advanced Computation (Fall)
Contemporary architecture is designed predominantly with digital software. Although the designer is the puppet master pulling the strings, different digital tools encourage distinct workflows, which have critical impact over design outcomes. Polygon-based modeling software, such as Maya, offers designers a range of sculpting techniques to construct form, which is vastly different from NURBS-based software such as Rhino. Polygon modeling provides a faster feedback loop between intuition and outcome, enabling unique aesthetic sensibilities, and at the same time challenging the user's precision and control. This course aims to explore the form-shaping capacity that polygon based software (Maya) affords to designers. The course will introduce students to a range of techniques concerning modeling in Maya, and will consist of lectures, tutorials and in-class work sessions.
 
608
Special Topics in Urban Theory Los Angeles
Special Topics in Urban Theory Los Angeles
Explore the city of Los Angeles through this advanced seminar in urban theory with an emphasis on contemporary architecture theory. Students will deepen their understanding of this extraordinary city’s historical transformations and recent development. Examine the city’s complex relationship with its environment as well as power and resource distribution. How, for example, does architecture imagine the city, its management, appearance, its cleanliness and contaminations? More broadly, this course aims to give the student new tools to analyze the contemporary material conditions of cities; it is curious about the history and theory of ecology, atmosphere, and environment.
 
609
Advanced Fabrication (Ley)
Advanced Fabrication (Ley)
This course provides an introduction to a range of new fabrication techniques and technologies that will, encourage students to rethink the nature of architectural fabrication and representation. The subject, matter in this course anticipates that students already have a working knowledge of the major material, groups within architectural design and construction (Wood, Metals, Concrete, Masonry, Glass, Plastics, and Composites). Over the course of the semester, we will look closely at how these materials are being, utilized and advanced in fields outside of architecture, and will also learn the methods and processes, that are used in their fabrication.
 
611
Advanced Building Systems Integration
Advanced Building Systems Integration
No other building system has more impact on the overall look, character and performance of a building than its façade system. However, far too often, aesthetic concerns have dominated façade design discourse while performative considerations have been limited. This course aims to develop a fundamental understanding of the relationship between the façade, building performance (energy consumption) and indoor thermal and visual comfort. We will work to develop a critical awareness of performance issues related to façade systems, the opportunities for enhanced performance and core skills necessary to evaluate, determine and integrate appropriate façade technology. Upon completion of the course, students will: Understand fundamental principles of façade construction and detailing. Understand fundamental relationships between energy, environment and building enclosure. Utilize appropriate modeling and analysis software. Develop core skills to evaluate, determine and integrate appropriate façade technology. Develop high performance façade proposals. Develop framework for further ongoing research on the subject.
 
613L
Seminar Structures Research
Seminar Structures Research
Vertical structures respond to gravity, wind, seismic, and thermal loads. They also need to be integrated with architectural objectives, creating a synergy of form and structure. This course covers various methods for stabilizing vertical structures, including foundation design, moment and braced frames, framed tube design, shear walls, and building diaphragm design in the context of wood, steel, concrete, and masonry structures. Students will explore the use of Multiframe; LDG (Lateral Design Graph); SDG (Structure Design Graph) to design moment frames, braced frames, and shear wall structures; and PDG (Post Design Graph) to design posts in wood, steel, concrete, and masonry for axial and bending stress. Required text, Structure and Design: https://titles.cognella.com/structure-and-design.html/ Detailed information is posted at http://www.usc.edu/structures/
 
615L
Seminar Environmental Systems Research
Seminar Environmental Systems Research
Acquire new building science concepts, and experience how they impact building performance. This course introduces the concept of total building energy performance, delineating the full range of performance mandates required for today’s architecture, including building integrity. Explore the relationships, opportunities, and conflicts of the performance mandates, and the integration of building systems necessary to achieve total building energy performance. Through lectures and seminar instruction, students will develop a basis for environmental design performance and system design skills, towards creating high-performance buildings.
 
635
Landscape Construction Assembly and Documentation
Landscape Construction Assembly and Documentation
This course builds an understanding of landscape materials and assemblies, construction documents and sequencing. Students will learn the content and organization of construction documents and specifications. Lectures, site visits and field trips will provide opportunities for students to observe multiple approaches to the use of site materials. Students will learn the basic vocabulary of site construction documentation and detailing and how to modify and adapt details for specific site conditions.
 
642
Landscape Architecture Design
Landscape Architecture Design
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 542abL Fully integrated landscape place design; reclamation sites at significant urban or natural locations.
 
691a
Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis
Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 549 Introduction to, and exploration of, topics leading to the development of a thesis prospectus and directed research towards the completion of the master’s thesis in heritage conservation. Credit on acceptance of thesis. Registration restricted to Master of Heritage Conservation students who have satisfactorily completed 12 hours of graduate course work and have permission of the Program Director. Graded IP/CR/NC.
 
691b
Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis
Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 549 Introduction to, and exploration of, topics leading to the development of a thesis prospectus and directed research towards the completion of the master’s thesis in heritage conservation. Credit on acceptance of thesis. Registration restricted to Master of Heritage Conservation students who have satisfactorily completed 12 hours of graduate course work and have permission of the Program Director. Graded IP/CR/NC.
 
692bL
Building Science Thesis
Building Science Thesis
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 596 This course has several coincident agendas. We will complete the Master’s Thesis for the Building Science program which each student has developed in preceding 596 and 692a classes. But in the process, we will address a broad range of ancillary topics. We will create a “culture of learning” as part of the course. Although it is a studio course, there will be guest lecturers, lectures of assigned topics and periodic reviews, as well as normal studio time. We will review the scientific method in general and as it applies to each thesis topic. We will consider the value and impact of investigative tools in the process and product of Architecture. We will write papers which could be submitted to conferences or journals as a prototype of technology transfer (and a measure of the value and validity of the material.) Those of you who have had abstracts accepted will use the abstracts as topics for these papers. We will do several interim presentations to the first year students and to outside consultants and to committee members, prior to the final presentation. We will examine topics in Building Science which are of current interest, whether or not one of the current theses addresses these topics. We will write the thesis in several stages, so that there is opportunity to modify and improve both the research and the writing prior to the thesis due date. Prior to the due date (currently April 1) each student will produce a thesis in the format acceptable to the University and with content acceptable to all committee members. Finally, each student will produce a shorter version of the thesis material in a format consistent with publication. In the process, each student will learn something about the content area of each other student’s thesis.
 
694
Research Publication Methods for Building Science
Research Publication Methods for Building Science
Technical documentation, graphic representation, and verbal presentation for writing and presenting journal articles and conference presentations in building science.
 
698aL
M.L.Arch. Thesis
M.L.Arch. Thesis
This seminar provides a conceptual foundation for the MLA research studio this fall and MLA thesis in the spring. The first half of the semester will be devoted to seminal readings on the subject of infrastructure, networks, systems thinking, and technology. In the second half of the semester, students will identify readings relevant to their chosen concentrations as they begin to develop their thesis bibliography. The course will be structured as a traditional seminar with all students participating and contributing. Directed research option for the M.L.Arch. degree. Credit on acceptance of research project. Graded IP/CR/NC.
 
698bL
M.L.Arch. Thesis
M.L.Arch. Thesis
Title: Chain Reaction: Using Networks to Affect Change Driving through the city, drawing water from the tap, turning on the lights, catching up with friends on Facebook, pumping blood through our bodies— these actions all depend on networks, the interrelated connections either physical or digital, technological or biological, localized or global, that taken together produce an effect that is greater than the disparate parts would suggest. Connections form the heart of any network and extend beyond a defined site or source. Like an internet meme or a signal malfunction on the New York City subway — sometimes even the slightest alteration to an existing system can cascade to create real change or real chaos. Landscape architects are trained in systems thinking; how systems work within themselves and integrate with others to perform necessary functions is a fundamental service we provide. The challenge of this studio will be to develop this skill—to understand how the pieces fit together, and, more importantly, develop strategies for improving those connections when things don’t quite fit. The site will be Los Angeles and the networks that most acutely influence the way Angelenos live and how the city functions. By the end of the semester, students will have identified a specific integration of networks and targets for intervention that will either allow the network to work better or, perhaps, re-appropriate it to transform the network’s purpose. The intervention you derive may be a specific site, a detail to be replicated over the whole network, or even a change in policy. Regardless, it will have an identified physical expression. Directed Design Research (DDR) is the title given to the independent design exploration that is the final studio-based requirement for the MLA degree. Students are required to identify and explore transcendent issues and principles through the discipline of landscape architecture design.
 
702L
Advanced Graduate Architecture Design- Themes
Advanced Graduate Architecture Design- Themes
Advanced thematic topical investigations emphasizing diverse areas of specialization. Projects will be faculty-led research investigations that concentrate on diverse areas of vital concern.
 
705L
Advanced Graduate Architecture Design- Topics
Advanced Graduate Architecture Design- Topics
Advanced topical investigations emphasizing diverse areas of specialization. Projects will be faculty-led research investigations that concentrate on diverse areas of vital concern.
 
793aL
Architecture Directed Design Research Option I
Architecture Directed Design Research Option I
Directed Design Research option for graduate level architecture degree. Credit on acceptance of research project. Graded IP/CR/NC.
 
793bL
Architecture Directed Design Research Option I
Architecture Directed Design Research Option I
Directed Design Research option for graduate level architecture degree. Credit on acceptance of research project. Graded IP/CR/NC.
 
795aL
Architecture Thesis Option II
Architecture Thesis Option II
Thesis option for graduate level architecture degree. Credit on acceptance of thesis. Graded IP/CR/NC.
 
795bL
Architecture Thesis Option II
Architecture Thesis Option II
Thesis option for graduate level architecture degree. Credit on acceptance of research project. Graded IP/CR/NC.