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691a

Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis

 

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 549 Introduction to, and exploration of, topics leading to the development of a thesis prospectus and directed research towards the completion of the master’s thesis in heritage conservation. Credit on acceptance of thesis. Registration restricted to Master of Heritage Conservation students who have satisfactorily completed 12 hours of graduate course work and have permission of the Program Director. Graded IP/CR/NC.

 
 
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  • 691a
    Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis
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    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 549 Introduction to, and exploration of, topics leading to the development of a thesis prospectus and directed research towards the completion of the master’s thesis in heritage conservation. Credit on acceptance of thesis. Registration restricted to Master of Heritage Conservation students who have satisfactorily completed 12 hours of graduate course work and have permission of the Program Director. Graded IP/CR/NC.
     
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    Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis
    Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis
    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 549 Introduction to, and exploration of, topics leading to the development of a thesis prospectus and directed research towards the completion of the master’s thesis in heritage conservation. Credit on acceptance of thesis. Registration restricted to Master of Heritage Conservation students who have satisfactorily completed 12 hours of graduate course work and have permission of the Program Director. Graded IP/CR/NC.