562

Architecture Themes and Case Studies Constructing the Modern City

 

Arch 562 will concentrate on architecture as it relates to urban form, urban space, and urban landscape. Students will investigate the relationship of buildings to our built environment, whether cities, suburbs, or constructed landscapes. The focus will primarily be on the modern city and the varying roles architecture has played in confronting, shaping, or even celebrating the effects of industrialization, post-­‐industrialization, and globalization.

 
 
Related Courses
  • 500aL
    Comprehensive Architectural Design
    Comprehensive Architectural Design

    Selected areas of specialization; projects chosen from a variety of studio offerings, all with an emphasis on the comprehensive design of buildings. Prerequisite: 402abL. Corequisite: ARCH 501.


    Related News: Fifth-Year Students Explore Heavy & Mass Timber Building Techniques


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  • 501
    Comprehensive Studio Support and Enrichment
    Comprehensive Studio Support and Enrichment
    The aim for the seminar is to gain a critical, theoretical, and technical understanding of the various methodologies that students will be asked to explore in the studio. Further, we will also explore the relationship between technological and cultural shifts in contemporary society. Students will work in pairs to present and lead discussions of each week’s readings in the first half of the semester. The second half will comprise of individual crits and each student will submit a 3-5000 word research paper at the end of the semester.
     
  • 502aL
    Architectural Design V
    Architectural Design V

    The final comprehensive architectural project under the guidance of a faculty adviser to demonstrate architectural knowledge, skills, and professional interests and goals.


    Pre-requisites: ARCH-500A and ARCH-501.


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  • 505aL
    Graduate Architecture Design I - Principles
    Graduate Architecture Design I - Principles

    A general introduction to architectural principles, intended to develop design and critical thinking skills and proficiency to communicate those ideas effectively. Open to graduate architecture majors only.


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  • 505bL
    Graduate Architecture Design I - Site
    Graduate Architecture Design I - Site

    Introduction to building systems and site design principles. Open to graduate architecture majors only.


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  • 507
    Theories of Computer Technology
    Theories of Computer Technology
    Building information modeling (BIM) is one of the hottest topics in the architecture / engineering / construction profession (AEC) today. Learn what it is (3d parametric modeling), common software tools (this class concentrates primarily on Revit Architecture and some Navisworks), how it relates to sustainable design issues (Vasari and Green Building Studio), and why it is useful to the AEC industry (including being able to create awesome adaptive components!). Although offered in the School of Architecture, the techniques taught are equally applicable to others with an interest in the applications of BIM. Building science majors, structural engineering students, construction management students, and others are strongly encouraged to enroll. It is assumed that students already have a basic understanding of 2D CAD and 3D digital modeling.
     
  • 511L
    Building Systems: Materials and Construction
    Building Systems: Materials and Construction

    Studies of construction system development within the architectural design context; processes and issues of selection, evaluation, optimization, integration, design control, and innovation, Departmental approval required.

     
  • 511L
    Seminar Building Systems
    Seminar Building Systems
    Develop an understanding of building materials and assemblies and their characteristics, impacts, and performance. Topics covered include building envelope performance and aesthetics, environmental systems (heating, cooling, daylighting, and acoustics), and basic principles of construction. Students will also develop an understanding of the financial implications of building components and systems.
     
  • 512
    Material + Process Material Systems
    Material + Process Material Systems

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 211 or 511L This design research seminar examines both disciplinary and extra-disciplinary technologies, techniques, and theories for the use of Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composite material systems in the design and construction of architecture.


    Students will gain a basic understanding of the engineering principles behind these material systems and establish a background in the architectural applications for FRP, both historic and contemporary. Students will also study FRP composites through selected extra-disciplinary precedents, such as racing sailboats, contemporary aircraft, and wind turbines.


    Students will examine the advantages and disadvantages of FRP composite systems, critically considering how FRP materials perform in relation to conventional building systems, technically and aesthetically. Students will explore performance-based FRP design by reimagining existing precedents as new architectural building systems.


    Students will be required to consider formal surface geometries, spatial opportunities, structure, life-safety, fabrication, transport, and assembly as some of the factors impacting architectural performance. Students will create a research-based design project, including original writing, drawings, diagrams, and models, speculating about the possibilities for use of FRP composite building systems in contemporary architectural design.

     
  • 514A
    Global History of Architecture I
    Global History of Architecture I

    A historical survey of global architecture, analyzed as a product of social, cultural, religious and political forces: 4500 BCE to 1500 CE.

     
  • 514B
    Global History of Architecture II
    Global History of Architecture II

    A historical survey of global architecture, analyzed as a product of social, cultural, religious and political forces.a: 4500 BCE to 1500 CE; b: 1500 CE to present.

     
  • 520
    Housing and Community Design for an Aging Population
    Housing and Community Design for an Aging Population
    Since 1950, the number of people over 65 has tripled and in the next 30 years, the over 65 population will grow 220%. This multi-disciplinary course focuses on the design of housing and community settings for older people, introducing students to a range of building types built to serve those recently retired as well as those who need health and caregiving support to stay independent. It examines the building type through context and case studies from northern Europe, Japan and the US. This course arms students with the knowledge and insight necessary to create environments that enhance the quality of life for older people. Three local site visits enable students to experience exemplar models and learn directly from discussions with older residents and administrative personnel.
     
  • 522
    Healthcare Design
    Healthcare Design

    This course focuses on the design of a diverse collection of hospital and community settings for healthcare. The course introduces students to a range of building types that vary from major trauma centers to small scale community outpatient facilities. It traces the evolution of healthcare settings from the Greek period to current times, including the newest emphasis on public health and lifestyle.This topic of healthcare design is huge in scale and magnitude. In fact, many firms who specialize in this area, have their own in-house training programs. This course is meant to provide an overview of this changing building type and how it impacts the practice of medicine (and architecture) today.


    The course starts with the history of the hospital as a building type from 500BC to the present day summarizing with a list of today’s challenges and tomorrow’s future trends. It describes powerful research findings that show how landscape designs can combat depression and promote relaxation. Building organizational strategies and programming approaches are reviewed as well as factors that affect appearance and functionality. It examines the patient room and new trends that embrace old ideas and introduce new ones. It demonstrates how and why families/friends have become more active participants in the healing process. It also shows how empirical analysis (often labeled evidence-based design) is affecting practice. Finally, it ends with a look at new technologies like imaging diagnostics and operating room procedures which are changing high-tech medicine.

     
  • 524
    Professional Practicum
    Professional Practicum

    Comparative studies of professional practice between U.S. firms and firms in other countries. Open to international upper-division undergraduate and graduate architecture students only. Graded CR/NC.

     
  • 525
    Professional Practice Pre-Design, Project and Office Administration
    Professional Practice Pre-Design, Project and Office Administration

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 302bL


    Design methodology, typology programming, site analysis, budget formulation and pro-forma procedures. Office management, emphasizing professional service and professional ethics as well as project management focusing on the architect’s responsibilities during construction.

     
  • 526
    Professional Practice Legal & Economic Context, Project Documentation
    Professional Practice Legal & Economic Context, Project Documentation
    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 302bL The laws and regulations that affect the practice of architecture and building economics and the development of comprehensive project documentation, detailing, specifications, drawing formats and organiza­tions.
     
  • 527
    Case Studies The Development of Urban Housing
    Case Studies The Development of Urban Housing
    If you are considering becoming a developer of housing after you graduate, this course will provide you with an introductory overview of the issues and challenges developers face in providing small-scale housing in an urban setting. Designed primarily for upper-division undergraduates, this seminar will explore the various elements and stages of the housing development process for projects in Southern California. Students will learn about and prepare each component, including land, entitlements, program, design brief, support spaces, site plan, hard and soft costs and a cost analysis/proforma suitable for presentation to banks, investors and lending institutions. The course will include guest lecturers who are practicing professionals in the Los Angeles housing development arena and who will present a series of local case studies. There will be ample opportunities for open discussion. Guest lecturers include non-profit and for-profit developers, architects, construction managers, entitlement consultants, cost & estimating specialists, lenders and investors, contractors, and property managers. Lectures will also include architectural design, quality, sustainable design, and the related cost issues. * For Spring 2018, this course will meet the first half of the semester and will include 2 required Saturday Field Trips, February 10 & 17.
     
  • 528
    Urban Housing Types and Typologies
    Urban Housing Types and Typologies

    This course introduces precedents for designing multi-family housing. A review of the sources of Pre-modern and modern housing types, the impact of building codes and technology on the form and construction, and a study of housing densities, provides the backdrop for the comparative analysis of multi-family residential patterns. Emphasis is placed upon developing a critical knowledge of historic housing typologies as they are applied to site conditions and groupings, building form and organization, and the design of individual dwellings.

     
  • 529
    Urban Housing-Programs, Precedents and Recent Case Studies
    Urban Housing-Programs, Precedents and Recent Case Studies
    The class will provide a historical overview of the major housing developments and innovations since the early 20th century, using a case-study format examining a wide range of issues that determine the form of urban housing in various conditions. Major emphasis will be placed on a detailed analysis of social, technical, and design factors affecting recent housing developments. This course will provide participants with a general understanding of the production of housing as a commodity and a building block of communities in the context of the geography of urban systems. It will focus on housing development in general and multi-unit housing development in particular. The course will use case studies to help illustrate concepts supported by in-class lab assignments that will reinforce the concepts discussed during the lectures. Participants will become familiar with the tools and the language of real-estate finance and market research. By the end of the course, students will be able to conduct feasibility analyses of potential real-estate projects that measure both the economic and social benefits of the project. Students will understand the regulatory environment as well as the economic imperatives related to housing, primarily from the perspective of architecture and planning, but will also consider inputs from sociology, economics, and development finance. Students will learn how housing is produced and how issues of race or ethnicity, family status, geography, and other characteristics affect the provision of housing in urban America.
     
  • 560
    A History of Architectural Theory 1400-1914
    A History of Architectural Theory 1400-1914
    Course Description: A seminar on architectural theory from Alberti to Scott, reviewing primary texts and subsequent criticisms. This seminar explores theories of architecture since the beginning of the Renaissance. It involves both reading original texts (where available in translation) and study of the contexts in which the theories were produced. We will also consider some of the buildings which influenced or were influenced by the theories. There are therefore two components to the analysis of the texts: theory and context. Seminal writings on architecture in western Europe, these texts certainly do not exhaust the thoughtful theoretical writings of many others, and there are essays from other cultures and in the United States during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, but they will not be considered in this course. What were the questions architects and theorists asked of architecture in the early modern era? What was important, and why? What were the assumptions they made about architecture, and about architects, and how did this color the types of questions they asked and the theories they devised? Course Objectives: In the most general terms, this course is an introduction to architectural theory from the 15th through the 19th centuries. Students should gain a working knowledge of developments in architectural theory in Western Europe during this period. The course has other objectives as well. Students will work on developing the ability to write a critical synthesis of a specific set of architectural theories, and be especially concerned that students learn to make cogent oral presentations.
     
  • 561
    Urbanism Themes and Case Studies
    Urbanism Themes and Case Studies
    Trace the history of ideas about the city - from antiquity to the present - through the cities which produced them. The course will take twelve cities as case studies and study their transformation and modernization through weekly lectures paired with selected readings from urban theory which emerged alongside their growth and change. The texts illuminate the varied and ongoing struggles all cities continue to wrestle with under pressures of rapid population growth, new technologies, and the need to become ecologically sustainable. The course articulates nuance and difference in place and culture; hoping to suspend -- for the duration of the course anyway -- the theory by some commentators that cities have become interchangeable: lost in the generic and ubiquitous nature of globalization, sprawl, and commercial capitalism.
     
  • 562
    Architecture Themes and Case Studies Constructing the Modern City
    Architecture Themes and Case Studies Constructing the Modern City
    Arch 562 will concentrate on architecture as it relates to urban form, urban space, and urban landscape. Students will investigate the relationship of buildings to our built environment, whether cities, suburbs, or constructed landscapes. The focus will primarily be on the modern city and the varying roles architecture has played in confronting, shaping, or even celebrating the effects of industrialization, post-­‐industrialization, and globalization.
     
  • 563
    Contemporary Architectural Theory
    Contemporary Architectural Theory
    Theory can be used as justification, as propaganda, as a guide for practice, as a set of principles, as a vehicle of thought, as a platform for debate, and as an architectural project in itself. This course considers the changing role of theory with respect to architectural, urban, and landscape practice over the course of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and aims to furnish students with a set of questions, techniques, and tools for criticism and self-critique. Focusing on key figures, movements, and texts, this course provides an overview of the principal theories that have informed, animated, or destabilized recent architectural, urban, and landscape discourse.
     
  • 564
    Descriptive and Computational Architectural Geometry
    Descriptive and Computational Architectural Geometry
    Geometry lies at the core of the architectural design process. It is omnipresent, from the initial form-finding stages to the actual construction. While design and geometry share a fundamental interest in form and shape, Descriptive and Computational Architectural Geometry aims to address the various natures of the historical relationship between mathematics, geometry, computation, and architecture. Through the display of historical mathematical models with formal affinities to contemporary architectural production, the course will provoke discussion about the relevance of a history of form, the origins of design technique, the epistemology of geometry models, and the justification for mathematical surfaces in architecture. This course examines the history, theory and practice of parallel (orthographic) and central (perspective) projection. The primary objective is to provide designers with the tools to imagine and represent with precision, dexterity, and virtuosity a continually expanding repertoire of three-dimensional architectural form.
     
  • 574
    Parametric Design
    Parametric Design
    This design seminar aims to investigate the parametric relationship between geometry and architecture element, in this case the relationship between the geometry of atrium and architectural circulation. We will begin by using parametric tools to examine existing architecture examples, which contains atriums and complex circulation systems, with the intention of exploring tensions, functions, and the spatial effects between them. Through this analyzation, students will construct their own geometrical narratives to express the parametric formal relationships of the subject of their studies. Thereafter, these geometrical narratives will be translated into iterations of physical models. This class consists of lectures and workshops, and will utilized both digital and physical media.
     
  • 580
    Field Studies
    Field Studies

    One of the most important aspects of field research is the opportunity to gain insight into the relationships between design language, building proposition and construction process of specific periods/architects/buildings/landscapes. It is an occasion to discover not only the tenets upon which an designer bases his work, but also how these tenets resolve complex relationships between a project, its site and the cultural/theoretical context in which it was constructed. Through thoughtful case study analysis students will explore how these external forces influence/direct the form and shape of the designed response.


    This Field Studies course will concentrate on projects and practices [from the analysis of buildings to the focused engagement with the methods of practice], landscapes and ecologies [both natural and manmade], and urban spaces [including parks, plazas, and urban (re)development projects]. The field study of these spaces and methods also provides an opportunity to understand the complex relationship of the designer with place. These place-based investigations will engage field studies to employ analytical methods, representational techniques, and speculative inquiry into the fundamental spatial and infra-structural elements of place. This investigation allows one to develop awareness as well as appreciate the complex relationship between a place, its inhabitants and the spaces that facilitate a multitude of events and activities.

     
  • 581
    Techniques in Digital Fabrication
    Techniques in Digital Fabrication
    The arrival of two KUKA 6-axis robotic arms marked a new phase in USC’s fabrication and design curriculum. With the reliability, accuracy and flexibility afforded by these machines we hope to change the way students understand and engage digitally driven tools for fabrication. Students taking this course will be given primary access to our KR6 Agilus and KR120HA industrial robots. Building on the original digital fabrication seminar, students will become well versed in the language of robotics and kinematics, becoming the de facto programers and operators. Utilizing our core shop and fabrication facilities, students will be expected to design and build custom end-effectors and tooling for the robots. While the concept of programming may seem imposing, newly developed parametric plugins such as KukaPRC allow direct interface between Rhino/Grasshopper and the robot arms. This interface will be the primary focus of our design work in this seminar.
     
  • 585
    Visual Storytelling and Entrepreneurship in Media
    Visual Storytelling and Entrepreneurship in Media

    Designers are storytellers. Each line we draw or model we build expresses intent. Historically, drawing has been the primary medium of expression in the communication of design ideas. Anyone can tell a story, but learning to tell an engaging, poignant story that generates real interest, enthusiasm, support and excitement is a vital tool in today’s fast-moving digital culture. This course helps the student understand how visual stories can serve as an active tool to critically explore, evaluate, and express design ideas.


    This course specifically stresses the instrumentality of online videos for communicating and thinking, and as a foundation for creative action. This master class in media making, distribution and promotion will benefit architecture and design students who want deeper and more practical uses for visual storytelling. In the first half of the course, the emphasis is on telling a visual story effectively. The second half is devoted to presentation and promotion, including crowdfunding. The emphasis throughout is always on the deep structure that is critical to creating an effective visual story, whether it is used to communicate design ideas, becomes part of a portfolio, pitch, or a resume.


    The core concept of this course is that architecture and design students are entering a profession that is increasingly entrepreneurial.


    Instructor Background: Lee Schneider is creative director of Red Cup Agency, a communications agency based in Santa Monica and known for its work with startups, entrepreneurs and social activists. He is the founder of Digital Fundraising School, an online school that helps media-makers, designers and tech visionaries become better crowdfunders. He is the author of "Be More Popular: Culture-Building for Startups." He has guest-lectured and taught workshops and classes at USC, University of Minnesota College of Design, Architecture for Humanity, and Public Architecture. Before his work with Red Cup, he was executive producer and founder of DocuCinema, a media production company that made documentaries and series television for The History Channel, Discovery Health, The Learning Channel, ReelzChannel, Food Network and Bravo. Early in his career, Mr. Schneider was a writer for Good Morning America and a producer for Dateline NBC.

     
  • 586
    City Cine Visuality, Media and Urban Experience
    City Cine Visuality, Media and Urban Experience
    In this course each week, we will compare chosen media examples (photography, films, anime/magna, commercials, web content, etc.) with selected seminal readings in urban planning and social theory to tease out latent connection between visual media and urban life. Each week is be structured around a different theme – city symphonies, alienation, gender, globalism, immigration, poverty, surveillance, ecology, noir, etc. Students are expected to select readings that particularly interest them each week and come to class prepared to discuss the major ideas at hand, referencing the required texts and the media example.
     
  • 590
    Directed Research
    Directed Research

    (1.0 - 12.0 UNITS)


    Research leading to the master's degree. Maximum units which may be applied to the degree to be determined by the department. Graded CR/NC.

     
  • 599
    Drawing Sets
    Drawing Sets

    In this seminar students will familiarize themselves with the history and evolution of the architectural drawing sets in an effort to better understand the particulars of its language and the significance of instructability. Students will be expected to develop a technical understanding of disciplinary graphic and annotative standards as they relate to the production of architectural drawing sets as well as an intellectual appreciation of extra-disciplinary methods of instruction-based production. 


    Lectures, readings and class-time conversations will together provide a foundation for understanding of the importance of instruction in the practice of architecture. Production-based assignments will be issued as an opportunity for students to demonstrate their technical and intellectual understanding of the subject matter.

     
  • 599
    Philosophy of Technology
    Philosophy of Technology

    This course provides a broad, general historical survey of the philosophy of technology, using Martin Heidegger’s seminal lecture, “The Question Concerning Technology,” as an inspiration and guide. Examining the ways in which technology has been addressed through time by different philosophical and critical traditions, from pre-Socratic discussions of techne to Deleuze’s machinic delirium, this course charts the progress of the human relationship with technology and the nature it mediates. While primarily concerned with philosophical developments, this course will index the evolution of such thinking to the state of technology and architecture at the time, emphasizing issues of particular importance for architects.

     
  • 605aL
    Graduate Architecture Design II - Integration
    Graduate Architecture Design II - Integration

    Basic principles of structural (seismic/wind and gravity), HVAC, building envelope, access/egress, building service systems; and sustainable strategies are critical to the proper execution of performative goals. The integration of building systems will be delineated to demonstrate the tectonic viability a design solution.


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  • 605bL
    Graduate Architecture Design- Comprehensive
    Graduate Architecture Design- Comprehensive

    Comprehensive project emphasizing the interaction between general principles and local sites, building technologies and total building design.


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  • 606
    Advanced Architectural Theory
    Advanced Architectural Theory
    Within contemporary architectural design a significant shift in emphasis can be detected – a move away from an architecture based primarily on visual concerns towards an architecture justified by its performance. Structural, constructional, economic, environmental and other parameters – concerns that were once relegated to a secondary level – have now become primary, and are being embraced as positive inputs into the design process from the outset. Architecture – it would seem – is now preoccupied less with style and appearance, and increasingly with material processes and performance. It is as though a new architectural design sensibility has emerged. But how exactly might we theorize this new sensibility? The course tracks this new development from its origins in materialist philosophies to its implications within the field of design. It draws upon biomimetics and other aspects of scientific thinking, such as theories of emergence and swarm intelligence, that are informing recent developments in contemporary design thinking. It goes on to consider the role of computation in this development, from new scripting techniques to fabrication technologies, from the scale of individual components to entire cities, and from terrestrial concerns to new robotic technologies being envisaged by NASA for application on the Moon. The aim of the class is to provide a theoretical manifesto for a new way of approaching design that is sweeping through architecture and urbanism.
     
  • 607
    Advanced Computation
    Advanced Computation

    This course stems from the assumption that architects should not only be able to use various tools but should have the ability to create new critical and experimental design tools that respond to specific design-questions. In this course, we will aim at the generation of design-question oriented customized digital workflows. These customized workflows will explore the potential of breaking down a design problem into several questions in order to approach architectural and urban research through a bottom-up method. This technique will allow us to experiment with converging varied inter-operational platforms in order to develop custom toolsets for each proposed design question. The process of workflow customization will amplify our ability to explore options and achieve depth and speed of analysis. In this course we will use Rhino/Grasshopper as meta-tools which enable the creation of other tools.  


    However, the course is not about software itself, but about experimental design processes. Using a series of custom scripts, techniques and workflows, Rhino/Grasshopper will be used to create new interfaces that disappear and become part of the Rhino environment or even part of the physical world. External input devices (cameras and sensors) will be used to create new relationships with 3d modeling, data will become incorporated into new forms of tools, and representation will be explored as a way to design the behavior of the user. Technology will not be used as calculators, but as augmentations of the designer that alters their design process.


    The point of the course is to develop computational design thinking in order to acquire a critical lens for the evaluation of digital tools. Through a closer look at the relationship between computational design theories and methods, we will engage in an experimental feedback loop where new ideas can generate new design techniques, and new design techniques can thus generate new ideas.

     
  • 607
    Advanced Computation (Fall)
    Advanced Computation (Fall)

    Contemporary architecture is designed predominantly with digital software. Although the designer is the puppet master pulling the strings, different digital tools encourage distinct workflows, which have critical impact over design outcomes. Polygon-based modeling software, such as Maya, offers designers a range of sculpting techniques to construct form, which is vastly different from NURBS-based software such as Rhino. Polygon modeling provides a faster feedback loop between intuition and outcome, enabling unique aesthetic sensibilities, and at the same time challenging the user's precision and control. This course aims to explore the form-shaping capacity that polygon based software (Maya) affords to designers. The course will introduce students to a range of techniques concerning modeling in Maya and consist of lectures, tutorials and in-class work sessions.

     
  • 608
    Special Topics in Urban Theory Los Angeles
    Special Topics in Urban Theory Los Angeles
    Explore the city of Los Angeles through this advanced seminar in urban theory with an emphasis on contemporary architecture theory. Students will deepen their understanding of this extraordinary city’s historical transformations and recent development. Examine the city’s complex relationship with its environment as well as power and resource distribution. How, for example, does architecture imagine the city, its management, appearance, its cleanliness and contaminations? More broadly, this course aims to give the student new tools to analyze the contemporary material conditions of cities; it is curious about the history and theory of ecology, atmosphere, and environment.
     
  • 609
    Advanced Fabrication (Ley)
    Advanced Fabrication (Ley)

    This course provides an introduction to a range of new fabrication techniques and technologies that will encourage students to rethink the nature of architectural fabrication and representation. The subject matter in this course anticipates that students already have a working knowledge of the major material groups within architectural design and construction (Wood, Metals, Concrete, Masonry, Glass, Plastics, and Composites). Over the course of the semester, we will look closely at how these materials are being utilized and advanced in fields outside of architecture and will also learn the methods and processes that are used in their fabrication.

     
  • 611
    Advanced Building Systems Integration
    Advanced Building Systems Integration
    No other building system has more impact on the overall look, character and performance of a building than its façade system. However, far too often, aesthetic concerns have dominated façade design discourse while performative considerations have been limited. This course aims to develop a fundamental understanding of the relationship between the façade, building performance (energy consumption) and indoor thermal and visual comfort. We will work to develop a critical awareness of performance issues related to façade systems, the opportunities for enhanced performance and core skills necessary to evaluate, determine and integrate appropriate façade technology. Upon completion of the course, students will: Understand fundamental principles of façade construction and detailing. Understand fundamental relationships between energy, environment and building enclosure. Utilize appropriate modeling and analysis software. Develop core skills to evaluate, determine and integrate appropriate façade technology. Develop high performance façade proposals. Develop framework for further ongoing research on the subject.
     
  • 619
    Digital Fabrication – Materials and Methods of Production
    Digital Fabrication – Materials and Methods of Production

    This course is a broad overview of multiple fabrication and construction techniques used in the production of architecture, furniture, and industrial design.


    This course will be a combination of lecture and lab. Lectures will cover three primary categories of industrial process (Additive, Subtractive, and Transformative) along with materials research (Plastics, Composites, Wood, and Metals). We will engage a series of discovery based, hands on workshops where students will begin small scale material and fabrication prototypes, utilizing various digital fabrication technologies (CNC milling, 3D printing, Laser Cutting, etc). In the second half of the course, students will further develop their initial material-based discoveries into refined, small scale projects that exhibit a high degree of material awareness and craft.

     
  • 702L
    Advanced Graduate Architecture Design- Themes
    Advanced Graduate Architecture Design- Themes
    Advanced thematic topical investigations emphasizing diverse areas of specialization. Projects will be faculty-led research investigations that concentrate on diverse areas of vital concern.
     
  • 705L
    Advanced Graduate Architecture Design- Topics
    Advanced Graduate Architecture Design- Topics

    Advanced topical investigations emphasizing diverse areas of specialization. Projects will be faculty-led research investigations that concentrate on diverse areas of vital concern.


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  • 793aL
    Architecture Directed Design Research Option I
    Architecture Directed Design Research Option I
    Directed Design Research option for graduate level architecture degree. Credit on acceptance of research project. Graded IP/CR/NC.
     
  • 793bL
    Architecture Directed Design Research Option I
    Architecture Directed Design Research Option I

    Directed Design Research option for graduate level architecture degree. Credit on acceptance of research project. Graded IP/CR/NC.


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  • 795aL
    Architecture Thesis Option II
    Architecture Thesis Option II
    Thesis option for graduate level architecture degree. Credit on acceptance of thesis. Graded IP/CR/NC.
     
  • 795bL
    Architecture Thesis Option II
    Architecture Thesis Option II
    Thesis option for graduate level architecture degree. Credit on acceptance of research project. Graded IP/CR/NC.