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447

Ecological Factors in Design

 
  • 3 units

  • Semester(s): spring

  • Discipline(s): landscapeArchitecture

  • Downloads:

Lectures, laboratory exercises and field trips introduce basic knowledge of incoporating ecological factors in urban design and interaction of landscape science with the human environment. The course will concentrate on both the history and theory of urban ecological design and on the, computing tools currently available to undertake quantitative (and usually spatial) analysis of the effects, of alternative urban designs. In this sense, the course is situated both within landscape ecology and urban, ecology and also in the applied disciplines of planning and architecture, and therefore is part of the newly, identified domain of “geodesign.”

 
 
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    Lectures, laboratory exercises and field trips introduce basic knowledge of incoporating ecological factors in urban design and interaction of landscape science with the human environment. The course will concentrate on both the history and theory of urban ecological design and on the, computing tools currently available to undertake quantitative (and usually spatial) analysis of the effects, of alternative urban designs. In this sense, the course is situated both within landscape ecology and urban, ecology and also in the applied disciplines of planning and architecture, and therefore is part of the newly, identified domain of “geodesign.”
     
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