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314

History of Architecture Contemporary Issues

 

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 214b The readings and assignments are designed to encourage critical thinking and analytical skills, in addition to an understanding of the criticisms leveled against the modern movement during the 1960s.

 
 
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  • 414
    Perspectives in History and Theory of Architecture - Landscape Imaginary
    Perspectives in History and Theory of Architecture - Landscape Imaginary
    This seminar offers a cross-cultural introduction to ideas of nature, landscape, and the environment. By focusing on “the landscape imaginary,” this course is primarily interested in excavating the mental constructs and cognitive mappings that have shaped attitudes toward the environment in a variety of cultures at a number of discrete historical moments, from antiquity to the present. The seminar makes use of primary sources (both written and visual) to analyze, compare, and contrast an array of key concepts including arcadia, paradise, forest, mountain, villa, landscape, wilderness, land, system, ecology, wasteland, and matter. Our aim will be to develop a critical understanding of categories that have shaped and continue to shape the ways in which we perceive, understand, react to, picture, and design our surroundings at a variety of scales, from the local to the global (and beyond).
     
  • 414
    Perspectives in the History and Theory of Architecture - Modern Architecture in Theory
    Perspectives in the History and Theory of Architecture - Modern Architecture in Theory

    This course examines and interrogates the concept of Modernism by focusing on a select number of key texts. Rather than offering a survey of the Modern Movement, this course looks closely at the writings produced by some of its central figures, including Adolf Loos, Antonio Sant'Elia, Bruno Taut, Walter Gropius, and Le Corbusier, as well as some of its earliest challengers. Themes and topics addressed include definitions of modernism and avant-garde; art, craft, and industry; new materials such as iron, glass, and concrete; the question of ornament; the modern metropolis; and the modern landscape.

     
  • 420
    Visual Communication and Graphic Expression New Forms and Concepts
    Visual Communication and Graphic Expression New Forms and Concepts

    An exploratory study of fundamental and innovative visual communication principles and graphic expression techniques to facilitate the design enquiry process for architects. 

    

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 302bL


    Registration Restriction: Not open to students with Freshman/Sophomore standing.


    In the past two decades, architecture has undergone a paradigm shift that influences the way we think about and approach issues of communication, representation, and production. Clearly, the new breed of computational tools and digital modeling programs offer students and practitioners alike opportunities for experimentation with new graphic forms and visual concepts. In a global networked culture that often places emphasis on “instant communication”—texting, tweeting, email, LED billboards, urban screens, Skype, social media, YouTube, etc., the IMAGE or SOUNDBITE has acquired a newfound significance as the de facto means of communication that’s unparalleled. Explore what bearing this paradigmatic change has on the practice of architecture, both as a medium and as a discipline and how these advances in technology shape our visual culture and impact the relationship between the medium and message.

     
  • 421
    Digital Architectural Photography
    Digital Architectural Photography
    All architecture students can prosper by learning to see light and how light alters the visual impact of architectural forms. Just as drawing allows students to refine their vision and perspective teaches how we see, the camera allows for yet another discipline to organically create with architecture and light. This course will teach students to create successful images of exterior architecture, interior architectural design, as well as architectural models. The student will become a highly competent creative digital photographic image creator with accurate exposure, proper color correction, and excellent printing output. They will successfully use specific digital tools for the architectural image (free-transform/HDR) to correct distortion and capture mixed lighting with multiple exposures. Students will be able to utilize light, structures and Adobe Lightroom in new ways. Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course each student will possess the following skills: Comprehensive understanding of architectural lighting. Heightened sensitivity to light and how it strengthens architectural design Ability to use High Dynamic Range (HDR): multiple exposures to create dramatic architecture/interior images without additional professional lighting. Control of Parallax (Free Transform Procedure) to correct distortion and perspective so buildings do not look like they are leaning to one side or falling back. Intermediate ability to photograph architectural models and small products, including a studio set up with studio lighting and possibly strobe lighting. Creation of exceptional images with light and architecture, including dusk imagery. Advanced amateur use of most Single Lens Reflex (SLR) digital camera functions, including: shooting raw, processing in Adobe Bridge and Photoshop CS6, batch processing, organization, color temperature, exposure/histograms, color management (curves/levels). Advanced use and knowledge of Adobe Lightroom 5. Knowledge of how to do a monitor calibration. Advanced eleven color profiled printing.
     
  • 422
    Architectural Photography- Film and Digital
    Architectural Photography- Film and Digital
    Explore another facet of photography through both film and digital media. Whether as a tourist or as a professional, the close observation and documentation of the built environment is a valuable skill. Learn to “see” light and how light alters the visual impact of architectural forms. Become a master of high-resolution images utilizing 35mm film cameras, 35mm Digital SLR cameras and 4x5 large format Sinar architectural film cameras with perspective/parallax control. Master Adobe Lightroom 5 including flawless workflow in the “Library” module and creative image enhancement in the “Develop” module. Photo manipulation using other current software will also be included.
     
  • 423
    Light, Color and the Character of Material
    Light, Color and the Character of Material

    Does not require D-Clearance.


    Registration restriction: Not open to students with Freshman/Sophomore standing.


    This seminar examines light, color and the character of material as a collection of medium for making worlds. Through linking various arts and design disciplines as a departure and overview for the course subject, Arch 423 exposes students to a spectrum of approaches in theory and application, drawing influences from nature, technology, and the vernacular. Class exercises aim to develop a number of visual concerns across object-oriented analysis to atmospheric and environmental construction. In the course of employing digital and analogue techniques, students will synthesize a repertoire of advanced graphic experiments for weekly progress and learning.

     
  • 424L
    Field Studies in Architecture
    Field Studies in Architecture
    Assignments rely principally on field trips and field research, while additional readings, class discussions and research will be utilized to develop a body of information and method of critique. Field research will focus on the first-hand observation, analysis, and documentation of existing buildings and their contexts so that lessons-learned can inform the design methodology applied in studio. Students will be challenged to articulate their analyses with respect to the specific urban, temporal, and cultural contexts. There will be ten assignments for each course: nine specific assignments and one assignment that you may choose the subject of yourself.
     
  • 425L
    Field Studies in Urbanism
    Field Studies in Urbanism
    The focus of ARCH 425 is on urban spaces, including parks, plazas, and urban(re)development projects. The field study of these urban spaces also provides an opportunity to understand the complex role of the architect-designer in the design of urban spaces. As a critical component of the urban environment, landscape architecture will be an important aspect of this class. These investigations will employ analytical methods, representational techniques, and speculative inquiry into the fundamental spatial and infra-structural elements of the city. Your research will be documented and communicated through mapping, plans/sections/elevations, diagrams, photo documentation and text.
     
  • 426L
    Field Studies in Tectonics
    Field Studies in Tectonics
    Buildings embody a series of performative criteria that form the fundamental motives for an architectural task. These functions are critical considerations in building design and are accomplished within the context of technological and economic possibilities. The focus of the course will be on technology in architecture, with an emphasis on structure, materiality, construction, material and assembly, and sustainability. Using annotated photo documentation, notations, and diagrams these criteria will be analyzed to explore how technology affects the form, the assembly of the architectural response, and, ultimately, how technology is integrated into the methodology of accomplishing the greater architectural goals of the building.
     
  • 440m
    Literature and the Urban Experience
    Literature and the Urban Experience
    What is Los Angeles? This has been a key question for a city that both exhilarates and confounds. Commonly derided as a landscape without history, Los Angeles is (as all cities are) part of a trajectory where past and future collapse into the present. How can we make sense of a place so defined by tropes and cliches? One way is to examine what these visions say about the city as it exists today. In this class, literature will be the lens through which we come to know Los Angeles. This is an exciting time to be in L.A., given the development of public transportation and pedestrian corridors, as well as L.A.’s sense of itself as a more connected, coherent city - less a loose collection of communities than a true metropolis. This is not a new idea; it goes back to the Los Angeles of 100 years ago. How did L.A., then, lose and regain sight of itself? What is the meaning of its circular evolution? To get at some answers, we will use Writing Los Angeles: A Literary Anthology, a collection of writings from Southern California that spans 100 years. Here, many of the city's signature texts and authors (Joan Didion, Wanda Coleman, Raymond Chandler, Walter Mosley) address the city from differing viewpoints. We will read these texts with a kind of double vision, looking at them both with respect to what they meant in their own time and what they mean now. In addition, we will apply a historiographer's perspective to talk about which texts have survived and which haven’t, and what this means for us vis-à-vis the city’s legibility. The editor of this important anthology, David Ulin (professor at USC’s Dornsife School), will guest-teach several of the classes. We will also read Ulin’s Sidewalking: Coming to Terms with Los Angeles, a companion of sorts to Writing Los Angeles that makes a critical argument about the city L.A. seems primed to become. In the middle ground between the stories and the streets of the city, we will discover something not just about this landscape, but also about its soul. And in the process of looking into its future, we will be joined by a second guest teacher, Greg Goldin. Finally, we will read Nina Revoyr's novel The Age of Dreaming, watch some seminal films that take place in Los Angeles, and feature a number of additional invited lecturers who will widen our conversation to encompass many of the hidden corners, geographical and otherwise, of Los Angeles.
     
  • 442m
    Women's Spaces in History "Hussies, Harems & Housewives"
    Women's Spaces in History "Hussies, Harems & Housewives"
    How cultures divide and occupy spaces throughout history reflect a diverse range of status differences, differences as apparent in pre-industrial as in postindustrial revolution societies. This course explores spatial differentiation from the perspective of gender. From the intimacy of the home to the larger rural or urban community, patterns of spatial differentiation reinforced unequal status based upon gender and made it more difficult for women to achieve equality. Spatial differentiation in the modern era has extended from the home to educational facilities to the workplace to the city as a whole, and it has marginalized women along with other groups. We will specifically consider the role of gender relations in the formation of the built environment, both the public and the private spheres. We examine spatial differentiation and its practice in ancient, pre-modern, and modern cultures. The focus is upon the expression of that differentiation in the house, workplace, and public sphere, but we also explore the responses of women to the systems of oppression manifested through spatial differentiation. Because this class meets University requirements for diversity courses, it is also concerned with ways in which relations of domination are concealed or suppressed. We employ methodologies from history, anthropology, architecture and sociology to understand the nuances of domination through spatial differentiation. We study the institutional structures that underlie spatial organization, who benefits and who is deprived by specific socio-spatial arrangements, the assumptions of scholars who have studied diverse cultures and their buildings, and how they conceived of gender relations. The films that we view have a two-fold purpose: on the one hand, they help illustrate spatial practices in non-western cultures, in pre-modern times, and in our own culture; on the other, the films enable us to discern how to decode gendered spatial practices in the visual realm.
     
  • 454
    Contemporary Asian Architecture
    Contemporary Asian Architecture
    Exploration of various “Asian” architectures, comparisons of areas, identifying current trends and impact of Asia on Southern California and Los Angeles.
     
  • 470A
    Architectural Studies Capstone- Preparation and Framework
    Architectural Studies Capstone- Preparation and Framework
    This course is the first in a two-part, capstone sequence designed especially for degree candidates in the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies program. The course is structured to assist students in identifying and investigating a subject consistent with their curricular concentration and relevant to their professional and academic goals. The course will bring students together in a seminar format to achieve three central goals: to provide a thorough introduction to research methodology, to foster proficiency in scholarly writing, and to develop an individual topic of inquiry. The course begins by discussing approaches to scholarly writing and documenting work, citation of information, and the identification of source material specific to each student’s curricular concentration. Then, working sequentially, students will identify a topic of inquiry, organize a literature review, develop a thesis statement, and write an abstract. Students will use the work they generate in this course to establish the basis for a capstone research paper to be executed in ARCH 470b. The 470ab sequence aims to imbue students with a love of, and understanding of, research and how to do it. In this way, the course positions itself as both capstone and threshold. It attempts to culminate a 4-year academic course of study, while simultaneously generating a personal research framework that can be further developed in graduate school and/or help launch a professional career.
     
  • 470B
    Architectural Studies Capstone- Seminar
    Architectural Studies Capstone- Seminar
    This course is the second in a two-part, capstone sequence designed especially for degree candidates in the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies program. The course will bring students together in a seminar format to develop an individual directed research paper with a critical focus/agenda that represents both a reflection of the BSAS program content and a rigorous investigation of the individual students’ focus and interests , as explored in ARCH 470a. In addition, students will be challenged to critically examine this subject within the broader framework of contemporary architectural discourse and related disciplines. A series of readings will introduce texts as examples of research involving architectural studies within a larger intellectual context. The readings will serve as a platform for both group and individual discussions. In addition, students will have the opportunity to develop significant presentation skills through a series of focused Pecha Kucha-style presentations. Students will meet one-on-one with the instructor for suggestions, guidance and paper edits. Students will also benefit from the counsel and collaboration of structured writing groups. Writing groups will be assembled loosely into themes, based on research topic s. Writing groups provide a constant source of constructive criticism, support, and encouragement for each member. The 470ab sequence aims to imbue students with a love of, and understanding of, research and how to do it. In this way, the course positions itself as both capstone and threshold. It attempts to culminate a 4- year academic course of study, while simultaneously generating a personal research framework that can be further developed in graduate school and/or help launch a professional career.
     
  • 481
    Furniture Design
    Furniture Design
    Explore the intersection of architecture, art, and design in this hands-on furniture design course. Four influential early 20th century movements (futurism, neo-plasticism, modernism, and constructivism) explored ideas relating to the changing nature of society, technology, industrialization, new discoveries, and invention. Artists and architects were interested in utilizing the newest materials, construction, and joining methods, as well as innovative finishing techniques. Steel and metalworking were at the forefront of this exploration. This course will look closely at furniture designed by a variety of architects and artists, ranging from Pierre Chareau to Ludwig Mies van der Rohe to Charles and Ray Eames. More contemporary design works and interpretations (Peter Pearce, Morphosis, Richard Meier, and Herman Miller) will also be discussed. Students will design and fabricate metal furniture.
     
  • 499
    Informed Form
    Informed Form
    This is a design research seminar that will explore the relevance of architectural form as a product of discovery by exploring the reciprocity between form (geometry), force (performance), matter (organization), and craft (fabrication). It investigates and extends the design research legacies of analogue form-finding in the works of Frei Otto, Antonio Gaudi, Heinz Isler, and Felix Candela by exploring digital and analogue techniques for discovering form through variable material and geometric organizations and force simulations, while simultaneously considering the design opportunities being afforded by advances in computation and fabrication technologies. In this elective course, students will research and analyze the history of funicular form and its applications within architecture, explore the application and manipulation of both physical and digital form-finding experiments, performative analysis and simulation, and digital fabrication protocols to explore the potential for materiality and non-standardization processes to augment performance through variable organizations. The goal of the course is to understand performance as a design catalyst for the exploration of form. Students must have proficiency in Rhino 3D and a minimum proficiency with Grasshopper. All other software will be introduced in the course. Students will need to have the following softwares installed: • Rhino 3D • Grasshopper plug-in for Rhino • Kangaroo plug-in for Grasshopper • Karamba plug-in for Grasshopper