Programs

Master of Heritage Conservation

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Los Angeles provides a unique laboratory in which to learn and challenge conservation issues.  As a relatively young and diverse global city, it is the ideal place to explore a relatively young and diverse global discipline. Our wealth of recent past resources raise a new set of research challenges and the city’s richly diverse communities woven throughout the tapestry of the built environment push us to acknowledge the many layers of history and meaning revealed in the city. It is also a place forever seeking the new, providing opportunities to protect the best of the past while embracing the landmarks of the future. 

 

Embedded in the School of Architecture at USC, heritage conservation students are instantly part of a multidisciplinary environment, linking landscape architecture, building science, architecture, and conservation. As such, the program curriculum is designed to expose students to a broad range of topics including materials conservation, policy and planning, conservation theory, global conservation efforts, architectural and landscape history, best-practices in resource documentation and evaluation, sustainability, and historic site management. Students are also encouraged to take advantage of the many academic resources in the broader university, including taking courses in real estate, regional history, urban planning, and spatial sciences. Program faculty are leaders in the field, a blend of academics and practitioners that grapple with conservation in real time, seeking creative solutions that balance the integrity of the past with a sustainable future. Through this broad exposure, students begin to formulate their professional path within the discipline.

 

The creation of a graduate thesis enables students to stretch themselves in the direction of their choice. Topics are chosen based on the interests of the student and vary from architectural and landscape history to policy analysis, from materials-based inquiry to industrial archaeology, and beyond. Below is a list of theses completed by our program graduates organized by year completed.  The typical program length is two years, although students may apply for advanced standing.

 

In addition, the Heritage Conservation programs are linked to two significant historic houses owned and managed by the USC School of Architecture: The Gamble House (Greene and Greene, 1909) and the Freeman House (Frank Lloyd Wright, 1924).

 

For an idea of what our students and alumni are talking about right now, visit the USC Heritage Conservation Network Facebook page or follow #uscmhc on Instagram!

 

The USC Master of Heritage Conservation program is a proud member of the National Council for Preservation Education.

 

The Heritage Conservation programs at USC include:

 

2017

  • Sarah Locke -- Beyond Significance: Integrity Analysis Considerations for Modern Residential Tracts of the San Fernando Valley

2016

  • Lannette Schwartz -- Conserving Historic Commercial Signs in Hollywood, California
  • Neha Tambe -- The Vanishing Wadas of Pune, India
  • Osmar Alaniz -- Historic Preservation in the United States Air Force: Exploring New Frontiers
  • Leslie-Anne Palaroan -- Empowering Communities Through Historic Rehabilitation: Creating a Maintenance Plan for Public Housing Developments in Los Angeles

2015

  • Rosalind Sagara -- Heritage and Collective Action: Examining Framing Processes in Two Locally Contentious Conservation Campaigns
  • Junyoung Myung -- Values-Based Approach to Heritage Conservation: Identifying Cultural Heritage in Los Angeles Koreatown
  • Sara Delgadillo -- Identifying and Conserving Pacoima: A Heritage Conservation Study of a Minority Enclave in the San Fernando Valley
  • Scott Watson -- Clinton Marr: Bringing Modernism to the Inland Empire
  • Melissa Jones -- Engaging Today’s Youth at House Museums: Forging a Vision for The Gamble House
  • Micaela Torres-Gil -- Preserving California City: An Exploration Into the City Plan Preservation of a Mid-Century, Master-Planned Community
  • Katelyn Rispoli -- Collaborative Conservation: How the Heritage and Environmental Conservation Movements Can and Should Unite for Progress
  • Maggie Wineland -- To Answer a Need: The History, Significance, and Future of the Women’s Club House
  • Christian Taylor -- Building on the Hillside: Community Planner and Architect Franz Herding (1887 – 1927)

2014      

2013

2012

2011

  • Ellen Knowles -- A Unifying Vision: Improvement, Imagination and Bernhard Hoffmann of Stockbridge (New England) and Santa Barbara (New Spain)
  • Sian Winship -- Quantity and Quality: Architects Working for Developers in Southern California, 1960-1973
  • Arash Kalantari -- Persian Paradise Gardens: History, Elements, Influences
  • Huiqian Chen -- Preservation and Rehabilitation of Lilong in Shanghai: from Guidelines to Practice
  • Cheng Yang -- Mining the Intangible Past of Virginia City’s Chinese Pioneers: Using Historical Geographic Information Systems to Document, Visualize and Interpret the Spatial History of Chinese in the Mining Camp of Virginia City, Montana (ca 1863 - mid-20th century)

2010      

  • Elysha Dory -- The Los Angeles African American Heritage Area: A Proposal for Development
  • Debi Howell-Ardila -- 'Writing Our Own Program’: The USC Experiment In Modern Architectural Pedagogy, 1930 to 1960

2009

2008

  • Sharon Smith -- Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue's Military Commissions: Identity, Process, Importance and Stewardship of these Cultural Resources
  • James Strawn -- Who’s Park: An Architectural History of Westlake-MacArthur Park

2007

  • Brian Zachary -- The Enduring Evolution of Kuruvungna: A Place in the Sun
  • Marla Cowan -- California’s Golden Chain Highway 49 of the Mother Lode: A Case Study of Historical Significance and Qualification as a National Heritage Area Corridor
  • Alison Jefferson -- Lake Elsinore: A Southern California African American Resort Area During the Jim Crow Era, 1920s-1960s, and the Challenges of Historic Preservation Commemoration
  • Holly Kane -- Arriving in Los Angeles: Railroad Depots as Gateways to the California Dream
  • Christine Lazzaretto -- The Bungalow and the Automobile: Arthur and Alfred Heineman and the Invention of the Milestone Motel

2006      

2005

  • Jill Vesci -- Preserving Modernist Architecture

2004

  • Vanessa Wexler -- Planning For Preservation: Exploring The Designation Of Historic Districts In Monrovia, CA
Downtown Los Angeles Broadway National Register Historic District
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Completion of this degree requires 48 units and includes 26 units of specified courses, 5 units of thesis preparation and thesis, and 17 units of elective courses as approved by the program director. 

 

 

Required Courses

404 Topics in Modern Architecture in Southern California 3
549 Fundamentals of Heritage Conservation 3
550 Heritage Conservation Policy and Planning 3
551 Conservation Methods and Materials 3
552 Introduction to Historic Site Documentation 2
553 History of American Architecture and Urbanism 3
554 Heritage Conservation Practicum: Advanced Documentation 3, max 12
555 Global Perspectives in Heritage Conservation 2, max 4
556 Readings in Heritage Conservation Theory 2
558 Fundamentals of Place-Making 2
691a Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis 1
691b Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis 4
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Learning Objectives for this Program

 

Following is the program curriculum for the 2017-2018 Academic Year.  For previous years, please consult the online USC Catalogue archive.

 

The USC Catalogue is the document of authority for all students. The program requirements listed in the USC Catalogue supersede any information which may be contained in any bulletin of any school or department. The university reserves the right to change its policies, rules, regulations, requirements for graduation, course offerings and any other contents of this catalogue at any time.

 

 

48-Unit Sample Curriculum

First Year, First Semester Units
549 Fundamentals of Heritage Conservation 3
552 Introduction to Historic Site Documentation 2
553 History of American Architecture and Urbanism 3
558 Fundamentals of Place-Making 2
  Electives 2
    Total Units: 12

 

First Year, Second Semester Units
404 Topics in Modern Architecture in Southern California 3
550 Heritage Conservation Policy and Planning 3
551 Conservation Methods and Materials 3
555 Global Perspectives in Heritage Conservation 2
691a Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis 1
    Total Units: 12

 

Second Year, First Semester Units
554 Heritage Conservation Practicum: Advanced Documentation 3
556 Readings in Heritage Conservation Theory 2
  Electives 7
    Total Units: 12

 

Second Year, Second Semester Units
691b Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis 4
  Electives 8
    Total Units: 12

 

36-Unit Advanced Standing Sample Curriculum

Requirements for Advanced Standing
Students must have one of the following: an accredited graduate certificate in historic preservation or heritage conservation; professional degree or professional registration in architecture or engineering; graduate degree in a related field, such as architectural history, planning or history; and at least five years of teaching or practice (may be combined). Each student will be considered individually. Qualified students will be admitted to a three-semester program at the time of review of admission. Students with advanced standing must complete 36 units.

 
First Year, First Semester Units
549 Fundamentals of Heritage Conservation 3
552 Introduction to Historic Site Documentation 2
553 History of American Architecture and Urbanism 3
558 Fundamentals of Place-Making 2
  Electives 2
    Total Units: 12

 

First Year, Second Semester Units
404 Topics in Modern Architecture in Southern California 3
550 Heritage Conservation Policy and Planning 3
551 Conservation Methods and Materials 3
555 Global Perspectives in Heritage Conservation 2
691a Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis 1
    Total Units: 12

 

Second Year, First Semester Units
554 Heritage Conservation Practicum: Advanced Documentation 3
556 Readings in Heritage Conservation Theory 2
691b Heritage Conservation Thesis Preparation and Thesis 4
  Electives 3
    Total Units: 12

 

 

 

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Curriculum
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