L.A. Forum for Architecture and Urban Design to present two summer exhibitions on housing

L.A. Forum for Architecture and Urban Design to present two summer exhibitions on housing

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To turn attention to housing in Los Angeles this summer, the Los Angeles Forum for Architecture and Urban Design will present two exhibitions: How Small is Too Small and BY-Right/BY-Design. The exhibitions will run concurrently from noon to 5 p.m. Friday, May 31, to Aug. 4 at WUHO Gallery, 6518 Hollywood Blvd., in Los Angeles.
 
The exhibitions will open with a public reception from 7 to 10 p.m. on May 31.
 
In the How Small is Too Small? exhibition, Katrina Stoll Szabo and Takako Tajima, with Daina Swagerty, will present an investigation into the potential for micro-unit housing in Los Angeles. 
 
Szabo and Tajima are constructing a full-sized 300-square-foot dwelling in the Forum’s gallery space, allowing visitors the opportunity to understand what it would feel like living in a micro-unit. The installation will feature a double bed, kitchen, and living and storage areas, replicating the bare essentials of a typical micro-unit.
 
This exhibition is being made possible with the generous support of Specialized Construction, Interior Experts General Builders Inc., Michael P. Johnson Fine Woods, Killefer Flammang Architects, Hard Media Inc., Woodbury University School of Architecture and the L.A. Forum.
 
Accompanying this installation is BY-Right/BY-Design, which explores the differences between market development and high design for multi-family housing in Los Angeles. 
 
Created by USC School of Architecture lecturer Liz Falletta, the exhibition pairs common, basic residential types by builders and real estate developers with examples of projects designed by noted architects working at similar scales, times and locations. The pairings are then linked to contemporary examples that bridge lessons from the past with ideas for how L.A. can further densify and develop to meet new challenges. 
 
Falletta investigated each project from the perspectives of real estate development, urban planning and design, using market analyses and proformas, regulatory plans and codes, and analytical drawings and diagrams to develop an understanding of L.A. housing from multiple viewpoints. 
 
She considers this to be more inclusive, as she views housing projects as fundamentally collaborative. The framework of the show pits those projects developed BY-Right, built to current planning, building and zoning codes, and those that are BY-Design, which adjust codes and restrictions through design interventions. Falletta sees this as a continuum between the two extremes, leveling the critical playing field of L.A. housing. 
 
This exhibition has been made possible with the generous support of the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy, the USC School of Architecture, Woodbury School of Architecture and the L.A. Forum.