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Structural Glass Facades and Enclosures

Structural Glass Facades and Enclosures

March 11, 2013
Time: 
4:00pm
Location: 

Harris Hall 101

The worlds' leading expert in structural glass facades and enclosures is also a Ph.D. student in the USC School of Architecture. After 30 years in a spectacular career working with leading architects and designers, MIC PATTERSON joined our doctoral program in 2008 to continue his life-long learning. Mic regularly speaks at conferences around the world, and recently presented five different sessions at the international building envelope conference in Finland. He is a highly sought "rock star" of these ultra-transparent facade systems.
 
Mic Patterson recently completed his book: "STRUCTURAL GLASS FACADES and ENCLOSURES." It has received very good reviews
 
"The building skin is a vitally important architectural consideration. No other building system combines as significant an impact to both a building’s performance and aesthetic. The use of glass as a component of the building envelope has been increasing since its initial introduction as a building material, accelerating in the twentieth century owing to the development of high-rise steel framing systems and curtain wall cladding techniques.
 
"Structural Glass Façade designs play off the primary attribute of glass, its transparency. As a body, a case can be made that these completed works represent a new façade technology. Characteristics of this technology include; a dematerialization of structure combined with highly crafted and exposed structural systems, integration of structure and form, complex geometries, extensive use of tensile elements, specialized materials and processes, integration of structural and cladding system, and a complex array of design variables ranging from facade transparency to thermal performance and bomb blast considerations.
 
"The push by leading architects for transparency in the building envelope has been the primary driver in the development of the new façade types. The façade structural systems have developed in parallel with the development and application of frameless, or point-fixed glazing systems. While any type of glazing system can be supported by the new façade structures, the point-fixed systems are the most used. Structural system designs with minimized component profiles were desired to further enhance the transparency of the façade. This quickly led to structural designs making extensive use of tensile structural materials as rod or cable elements.
 
"While applications have been limited to a small niche market in the overall construction industry, many innovative designs have been introduced over the years, with many more imitations and variations springing from those. As a result, this technology has matured over the years and is no longer largely comprised of experimental structures."